The Capital and the Colonies: London and the Atlantic Economy 1660-1700

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 17, 2010 - Business & Economics - 329 pages
Between 1660 and 1700, London established itself as the capital and commercial hub of a thriving Atlantic empire, accounting for three quarters of the nation's colonial trade, and playing a vital coordinating role in an increasingly coherent Atlantic system. Nuala Zahedieh's unique study provides the first detailed picture of how that mercantile system was made to work. By identifying the leading colonial merchants, she shows through their collective experiences how London developed the capabilities to compete with its continental rivals and ensure compliance with the Navigation Acts. Zahedieh shows that in making mercantilism work, Londoners helped to create the conditions which underpinned the long period of structural change and economic growth which culminated in the Industrial Revolution.
 

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Contents

1 Introduction
1
2 London and the Atlantic economy
17
3 Merchants
55
4 Shipping
137
5 Imports
184
6 Exports
238
7 Conclusion
280
Bibliography
293
Index
322
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About the author (2010)

Nuala Zahedieh is a senior lecturer in economic and social history at the University of Edinburgh. She has previously contributed to various journals and edited books of essays including The Oxford History of the British Empire, Volume 1 (1998).

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