The Cavalry Journal, Volume 30

Front Cover
United States Cavalry Association, 1921 - Mechanization, Military
 

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Page 166 - When Congress shall have authorized the use of the armed land forces of the United States for any purpose requiring the use of troops in excess of those of the Regular Army...
Page 296 - To bring together young men of all types, both native and foreign born; to develop closer national and social unity; to teach the privileges, duties, and responsibilities of American citizenship; to stimulate the interest of the youth of this country in the importance of military training, as a benefit to the individual taking such training and as an asset vital in the problem of national defense.
Page 87 - It is, of course, impossible to give you any definite instructions in regard to this movement, and were it not impossible to do so the Department Commander places too much confidence in your zeal, energy and ability to wish to impose upon you precise orders which might hamper your action when nearly in contact with the enemy.
Page 424 - That the applicant's disability is the result of an injury or disease, or of an aggravation thereof, suffered or contracted in the active military or naval service during the World War...
Page 31 - It is a pity, my dear sir, and a reproach, that our administration have no general plan. Certainly there ought to be one formed without delay.
Page 31 - Since it is agreed that we are not to keep on foot numerous forces instructed and disciplined, military science in its various branches ought to be cultivated with peculiar care, in proper nurseries, so that there may always exist a sufficient body of it ready to be imparted and diffused, and a competent number of persons qualified to act as instructors to the additional troops which events may successively require to be raised.
Page 87 - Brigadier-General commanding directs that as soon as your regiment can be made ready for the march, you proceed up the Rosebud in pursuit of the Indians whose trail was discovered by Major Reno a few days since. It is, of course, impossible to give any definite instructions in regard to this movement, and, were it not impossible to do so, the Department Commander places too much confidence in your zeal, energy and ability to wish to impose upon you precise orders which might hamper your action when...
Page 166 - To provide an adequate, organized, balanced, and effective expeditionary force, which shall be available for emergencies within the continental limits of the United States or elsewhere and which will serve as a model for the organization, discipline, and...
Page 31 - No sentiment is more just than this, that in proportion as the circumstances and policy of a country forbid a large military establishment, it is important that as much perfection as possible should be given to that which may at any time exist.
Page 109 - ... down. Bertie stood up by the fireplace, as I think I did, too, from time to time. I came away feeling that the party had been a failure and that we had failed to establish contact, but with no other particular impression. You know the sort of situation when two familiar friends talk at a visitor. I had never seen him before, and I never saw him again. Many years later he recorded in a letter, which is printed in his published correspondence, that I was the only member of Bloomsbury who had supported...

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