The Changing Shape of Art Therapy: New Developments in Theory and Practice

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Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2000 - Medical - 207 pages
Including contributions from some of the leading art therapists in Britain, this important book addresses the key issues in the theory and practice of art therapy. The fundamental significance of the art in art therapy practice permeates the book, close attention being paid by several writers to the art-making process and the aesthetic responses of therapist and client. Other authors explore the tensions between art and therapy, images and speech, subjectivity and objectivity, arguing that the dynamic interplay between these elements is inherent to the practice of art therapy. The role of containment is another theme that is explored by contributors in a variety of ways to highlight the importance not only of the therapeutic containment of the client by the therapist, but also the containment of the therapist. The physical contexts of the session, within an art room and within the larger working environment, are identified as important arenas where conflict and tension is experienced and must be explored if art therapy is to continue to develop.
 

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Contents

Introduction
7
The Triangular Relationship and the Aesthetic
55
Back to the Future Thinking about Theoretical
84
The Art Room as Container in Analytical
99
Keeping the Balance Further Thoughts
115
Failure in Group Analytic Art Therapy
143
THE CONTRIBUTORS
200
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About the author (2000)

Andrea Gilroy is Programme Co-ordinator for Art Psychotherapy at the University of London, Goldsmiths' College, where she has worked for over twenty years. She is also involved with the development of art therapy in Australia through her work as an educator and researcher at the Unviersity of Western Sydney, Nepean. Gerry McNeilly is senior adult psychotherapist, group analyst and art psychotherapist. He currently works with the Psychotherapy Service, South Warwickshire Combined NHS Trust. He has been involved in training with Birmingham University and the Institute of Group Analysis in England, Russia and Greece. He is an art therapy educator and is developing group analytic art therapy training in Lisbon with the Portuguese Art Therapy Society.

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