The Cromwellian settlement of Ireland

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1868
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Page 70 - Out of every corner of the woods and glens they came creeping forth upon their hands, for their legs could not bear them ; they looked like anatomies of death, they spake like ghosts crying out of their graves...
Page 146 - ... recovery for them but by ancient prudence, whence of necessity it must come to pass that this drug be better known. If France, Italy, and Spain were not all sick, all corrupted together, there would be none of them so ; for the sick would not be able to withstand the sound, nor the sound to preserve their health, without curing of the sick. The first of these nations (which if you stay her leisure, will in my mind be France) that recovers the health of ancient prudence, shall certainly govern...
Page 177 - ... where they saw a smoke; it was so rare to see either smoke by day or fire or candle by night.
Page 18 - I found a series of Order Books of the Commissioners of the Parliament of the Commonwealth of England for the Affairs of Ireland...
Page 177 - About the years 1652 and 1653," says Colonel Lawrence, in his Interests of Ireland, " the plague and famine had so swept away whole counties, that a man might travel twenty or thirty miles and not see a living creature, either man, or beast, or bird, — they being all dead, or had quitted those desolate places.
Page 182 - Wherein it is great wonder to see the odds which is between the zeal of Popish priests and the ministers of the gospel; for they spare not to come out of Spain, from Rome, and from Rheims, by long toil and dangerous travelling hither, where they know peril of death awaiteth them, and no reward of riches is to be found, only to draw the people unto the Church of Rome...
Page 101 - ... seize them : by which this bloody people will know that they [the officers] are not degenerated from English principles ; though I presume we shall be very tender of hanging any except leading men ; yet we shall make no scruple of sending them to the West Indies...
Page 95 - was that Spenser who, by his writings touching the reduction of the Irish to civility, brought on him the odium of that nation ; and for those works and his other good services Queen Elizabeth conferred on him that estate which the said William Spenser now claims.
Page 36 - Institutions, and a few other parings of these two faculties. I have seen them where they kept school, ten in some one chamber, grovelling upon couches of straw, their books at their noses, themselves lying flat prostrate, and so to chant out their lessons by piecemeal...
Page 77 - Irish are souldiers the first day of their birth. The famous Henry IV., late king of France, said there would prove no nation so resolute martial men as they, would they be ruly, and not too headstrong. And Sir John...

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