The Cult of Art in Nazi Germany

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Stanford University Press, 2004 - Art - 271 pages
The Cult of Art in Nazi Germany presents a new interpretation of National Socialism, arguing that art in the Third Reich was not simply an instrument of the regime, but actually became a source of the racist politics upon which its ideology was founded. Through the myth of the "Aryan race," a race pronounced superior because it alone creates culture, Nazism asserted art as the sole raison d'être of a regime defined by Hitler as the "dictatorship of genius." Michaud shows the important link between the religious nature of Nazi art and the political movement, revealing that in Nazi Germany art was considered to be less a witness of history than a force capable of producing future, the actor capable of accelerating the coming of a reality immanent to art itself.

 

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Contents

ARTIST AND DICTATOR I
1
A SAVIOR
26
EXHIBITING THE GENIUS
74
REPRODUCING THE GENIUS
123
Notes
223
Glossary of Nazi Terms
255
Index of Names of Persons
265
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Eric Michaud is Professor at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris.

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