The Design of Everyday Things: Revised and Expanded Edition

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Basic Books, Nov 5, 2013 - Business & Economics - 384 pages
29 Reviews
The ultimate guide to human-centered design
Even the smartest among us can feel inept as we fail to figure out which light switch or oven burner to turn on, or whether to push, pull, or slide a door. The fault, argues this ingenious-even liberating-book, lies not in ourselves, but in product design that ignores the needs of users and the principles of cognitive psychology. The problems range from ambiguous and hidden controls to arbitrary relationships between controls and functions, coupled with a lack of feedback or other assistance and unreasonable demands on memorization.
The Design of Everyday Things shows that good, usable design is possible. The rules are simple: make things visible, exploit natural relationships that couple function and control, and make intelligent use of constraints. The goal: guide the user effortlessly to the right action on the right control at the right time.

The Design of Everyday Things is a powerful primer on how--and why--some products satisfy customers while others only frustrate them.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Cheryl_in_CC_NV - LibraryThing

A little too dated, unfortunately. Lots of his complaints have been addressed - but more issues continually arise. An updated and better written text should be required reading for every architect & designer. I found plenty of tidbits for a general interest reader. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - nmarun - LibraryThing

I had this book on my list for quite some time, but somehow it was getting postponed. Now that I've read it, I'm glad I did. The concepts mentioned by Donald were no doubt very interesting, but the ... Read full review

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About the author (2013)

Don Norman is a co-founder of the Nielsen Norman Group, and holds graduate degrees in both engineering and psychology. His many books include Emotional Design, The Design of Future Things, and Living with Complexity. He lives in Silicon Valley, California.