The Developing Mind: How Relationships and the Brain Interact to Shape who We are

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Guilford Publications, 1999 - Psychology - 394 pages
This book goes beyond the nature and nurture divisions that traditionally have constrained much of our thinking about development, exploring the role of interpersonal relationships in forging key connections in the brain. Daniel J. Siegel presents a groundbreaking new way of thinking about the emergence of the human mind and the process by which each of us becomes a feeling, thinking, remembering individual. Illuminating how and why neurobiology matters, this book is essential reading for clinicians, educators, researchers, and students interested in human experience and development across the life span

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The Developing Mind

User Review  - Overstock.com

The material in this book has great value for both parents and educators. Read full review

Review: The Developing Mind: How Relationships and the Brain Interact to Shape Who We Are

User Review  - Tanya - Goodreads

This book has added much to my knowledge about the interaction between the physical brain and the mind, what influences development and how it all hangs together. It has really added to my understanding in ways that leaves me awed. It is also written compassionately. A real joy! Read full review

About the author (1999)

Daniel J. Siegel, MD

, is an internationally acclaimed author, award-winning educator, and child psychiatrist. He is Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the University of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine, where he serves as Co-Investigator at the Center for Culture, Brain, and Development and Co-Director of the Mindful Awareness Research Center. He is also the Executive Director of the Mindsight Institute, an educational center devoted to promoting insight, compassion, and empathy in individuals, families, institutions, and communities. Dr. Siegel's books include Mindsight, The Mindful Brain, The Mindful Therapist, Parenting from the Inside Out, and The Whole-Brain Child.

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