The East Highland Way: Detailed Walking Guide

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Sleepers Hill Publications, 2010 - East Highland Way (Scotland) - 78 pages
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Clear instructions & outstanding photos. The guide provides good background info regarding the historical attractions and wildlife that one should expect to find on the walk. The route description is written from west to east and in this way it forms an obvious extension to the West Highland Way. The navigational instructions are fairly clear and detailed, providing an interesting commentary on place name origins and local folklore. The overview maps are fairly straight forward and for the more complicated junctions the guide provides more detailed maps. Another plus point is the guide provides some helpful route alternatives – allowing one to plan their walk with some flexibility.
The guide breaks the route down into 7 sections and provides elevation profiles, accommodation and refreshment info for each. The photographic quality is quite exceptional, showing the route and it’s wildlife in all seasons. Unlike many other walks, the East Highland Way seems to be packed with attractions, castles, ski centres, sculpture parks, lochs, dams, rivers, beaches, museums and much more!
 

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A guidebook’s just out for Scotland’s newest long-distance walk – the East Highland Way.
Founded in 2007, the East Highland Way (EHW) connects parts of three of Scotland’s existing long-distance
paths – the West Highland Way, the Speyside Way and the Great Glen Way – to form a new coast to coast route, between Loch Linnhe and the Spey Bay at Buckie. It also means that two of Scotland’s top adventure bases, Aviemore and Fort William, are linked by a footpath.
“The contrast in natural habitats along the route provides the East Highland Way with a distinct character,” says the EHW’s creator and guidebook author Kevin Langan.
“The journey passes seamlessly through enchanting broadleaf forests, loch-side trails and quiet mountain wilderness. It skirts unspoilt marshlands and also explores the last remnants of the ancient Caledonian Pine forests of Inshriach.
“The route’s been optimised to engage with accommodation where possible, making it more accessible for walkers of all abilities,” he finishes.
The East Highland Way (so named as it finishes in Aviemore on the eastern edge of Highland Region) is 78 miles or 125km long. The new guidebook has maps and wonderful pictures. It costs 11.95 and is available from http://www.easthighlandway.com, as is more info on the walk.
Further Info:
ISBN: 978-0-9567054-0-2
Published by: Sleepers Hill Publications 2010
Author: Kevin Langan
Pages: 80 (18x18cm) Colour/Softcover
Photography: David Langan (www.thenorthlight.co.uk)
Maps: based on the latest digital open GPS information.
Includes: A detailed route description for the whole trail, a table of distances, historical attractions, wildlife info, section maps + detail maps, route profiles and all the info you need for a great adventure.
See: http://www.easthighlandway.com
 

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