The Enigma of Health: The Art of Healing in a Scientific Age

Front Cover
Stanford University Press, 1996 - Philosophy - 180 pages
0 Reviews
In this important new book, Hans-Georg Gadamer discusses the transformation in human self-understanding wrought by the scientific worldview, focusing in particular on the unparalleled achievements of modern medicine.

He explores the ethical and humanist issues raised by the technological successes of modern clinical practice, and relates them to the classical conception of "praxis" in the philosophical tradition.

In a series of lucid and engaging analyses, Gadamer eloquently defends the idea of medicine, not only as a "science of health, but as an "art" of hermeneutic relevance, requiring the exercise of practical judgment and personal interpretation. We should, he argues, recognize the limits of purely technical approach to healing, as well as the importance of a qualitative approach to medical treatment.

Written by one of the leading philosophers of the twentieth century, this brilliant meditation on health, illness, and the art of healing will be of interest to general readers as well as students of philosophy and social thought.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
1
II
31
III
45
IV
61
V
70
VI
83
VII
92
VIII
103
IX
117
X
125
XI
141
XII
152
XIII
163
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

Cornucopia Limited
Richard Coyne
Limited preview - 2007
All Book Search results »

About the author (1996)

Hans-Georg Gadamer, now ninety-five, is one of Germany's most eminent philosophers. Many of his books have appeared in English translation, including the seminal Truth and Method (Sheed and Ward, Ltd., l975) and, closest in topic, perhaps, to this book, Reason in the Age of Science (MIT, l982).

Bibliographic information