The Exposition of 1851: Or, Views of the Industry, the Science, and the Government, of England

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J. Murray, 1851 - Great Exhibition - 231 pages
 

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Contents

I
1
II
7
III
12
IV
26
V
42
VI
48
VII
55
VIII
64
X
112
XI
125
XII
149
XIII
173
XIV
189
XV
202
XVI
209
XVII
220

IX
99

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Page 295 - The author has now incontestably won for himself the title, not merely of a historian, but of the historian of Greece.— Quarterly Review.
Page 269 - The distinctive characteristic of the Analytical Engine, and that which has rendered it possible to endow mechanism with such extensive faculties as bid fair to make this engine the executive right-hand of abstract algebra, is the introduction into it of the principle which Jacquard devised for regulating, by means of punched cards, the most complicated patterns in the fabrication of brocaded stuffs.
Page 173 - IT is not a bad definition of man to describe him as a tool-making animal. His earliest contrivances to support uncivilized life, were tools of the simplest and rudest construction. His latest achievements in the substitution of machinery, not merely for the skill of the human hand, but for the relief of the human intellect, are founded on the use of tools of a still higher order.
Page 305 - G.) Cairo, Petra, and Damascus, described from Notes made during a Tour in those Countries : with Remarks on the Government of Mehemet Ali, and on the present prospects of Syria.
Page 295 - History of the War of the Succession in Spain. By LORD MAHON.
Page 304 - Histories are constructed on a plan which is novel and we think well chosen, and we are glad to find that they are deservedly popular, for they cannot be too strongly recommended."— Journal of Education* A HISTORY OF ENGLAND, FROM THE FIRST INVASION BY THE ROMANS.
Page 12 - It is to the munificence of these two princes that the Royal Society of London, and the Academy of Sciences at Paris...
Page 308 - The publication of this system forms an epoch in geological research. . . The author has developed the first broad outlines of a new system of classification, capable of effecting for geology what the natural system of Jussieu had effected for botany. It is a work which must necessarily become a standard for geologists.
Page 295 - Mr. Hallam is, on the whole, far better qualified than any other writer of our time for the office which he has undertaken. He has great industry and great acuteness. His knowledge is extensive, various, and profound. His mind is equally distinguished by the amplitude of its grasp, and by the delicacy of its tact.

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