The Farming of Prehistoric Britain

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CUP Archive, 1981 - History - 246 pages
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Peter Fowler's essay on later prehistoric agriculture in the first volume of The Agrarian History of England and Wales was hailed by reviewers as a 'masterpiece of informed synthesis'. In The Farming of Prehistoric Britain Dr Fowler, a foremost authority on agrarian archaeology, has revised and updated his original work to provide an accessible and comprehensive survey of the evolution of British farming and its landscape during the last two millennia BC. Emphasizing past gains in knowledge from experimental, aerial and field archaeology, Dr Fowler demonstrates how the application of archaeological approaches to agrarian history has made the subject central to our understanding of the prehistoric period. Accompanied by a wealth of illustrations, he examines the composition, distribution and farming activities of the human population of the British Isles in the light of research into its environment, capabilities, settlements and field systems. He describes the evidence for, and the techniques and technology of, arable and pastoral farming, and concludes by discussing some cultural, social and economic achievements of the agrarian communities of later prehistoric Britain.
 

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Contents

CHAPTER
10
Agrarian Techniques and Technology
94
The Achievement of Later Prehistoric Farming in Britain
201
SOURCES AND BIBLIOGRAPHY
219
Index
236
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About the author (1981)

Peter Fowler absorbed the elements of field archaeology informally from several gifted teachers before he graduated in History at Oxford. Later he came under the inspiring influence of Colin Bowen, field archaeologist par excellence, who helped develop what became the author's lifelong interest in fields, farming and landscape. His principal career moves took him from the Royal Commission on Historical Monuments (England) into Adult Education at Bristol University - where he became Reader in Archaeology - back to the Royal Commission as Secretary, and then to the University of Newcastle upon Tyne as Professor of Archaeology. He eventually resigned his Chair to pursue full-time writing and research. This book is a sequel to The Farming of Prehistoric Britain (1983), also published by Cambridge University Press.

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