The Germanic Isle: Nazi Perceptions of Britain

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Oct 26, 2000 - History - 274 pages
Despite Hitler's tactical duplicity at Munich, there is overwhelming evidence that one of the Nazis' fundamental objectives was to forge an alliance with Britain. This book discusses how the Nazis attempted to emulate the "ruthlessness" of the British Empire as they sought to enslave eastern Europe. It explores a wide range of sources, in popular culture and the media, diaries, secret police files, and views of the Nazi leadership, to show that there was a surprisingly enduring affection for Britain and British culture among ordinary Germans, even during the virulent anti-British propaganda of the war years.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
The view from Weimar German perceptions of Britain before 1933
7
The Germanic isle Britain and Nazi racial science
38
Empire builders Britain as a paradigm for Nazi expansion
63
Their aged bones are rattling Britain and the Nazi concept of modernity
98
The class struggle of the nations Britain and Nazi anticapitalism
129
The chorus of hypocrites history and propaganda
159
The land without music culture and propaganda
182
The decline of the West German fears and illusions in the shadow of defeat
200
Conclusion
221
Notes
225
Bibliography
258
Index
266
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