The God Experiment: Can Science Prove the Existence of God?

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Paulist Press, 2000 - Religion - 248 pages
Down the centuries there have been various attempts to prove the existence of God, and to demonstrate God's action in the world. Russell Stannard, the distinguished physicist and author, looks at what modern science can bring to the discussion.
 

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Contents

The Prayer Experiment
1
Do Miracles Happen?
13
Life Beyond Death
27
Staying Within the Law
36
A Meeting of Minds
49
Getting Acquainted with God
67
Why Evil and Suffering?
80
Our Place in the Scheme of Things
102
Human Origins
137
Further Insights from Evolution
155
A Case of Overdesign?
175
God and Time
196
The Ultimate Nature of God
214
Afterword
234
Index
236
Copyright

How It All Began
113

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About the author (2000)

Paul Davies is an internationally acclaimed physicist, writer and broadcaster. He received degrees in physics from University College, London. He was Professor of Natural Philosophy in the Australian Centre for Astrobiology at Macquarie University, Sydney and has held previous academic appointments at the Universities of Cambridge, London, Newcastle upon Tyne and Adelaide. Most of his research has been in the area of quantum field theory in curved spacetime. Davies has also has written many books for the general reader in the fascinating fields of cosmology and physics. He is the author of over twenty-five books, including The Mind of God, Other Worlds, God and the New Physics, The Edge of Infinity, The Cosmic Blueprint, Are We Alone?, The Fifth Miracle, The Last Three Minutes, About Time, and How to Build a Time Machine. His awards include an Advance Australia Award for outstanding contributions to science, two Eureka Prizes, the 2001 Kelvin Medal and Prize by the Institute of Physics, and the 2002 Faraday Prize by The Royal Society for Progress in religion. He also received the Templeton Prize for his contributions to the deeper implications of science. In April 1999 the asteroid 1992 OG was officially named (6870) Pauldavies in his honour.

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