The Hierarchy of States: Reform and Resistance in the International Order

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Cambridge University Press, Nov 2, 1989 - Political Science - 253 pages
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Combining a detailed examination of theory with a full and up-to-date account of historical development, this study analyzes the nature of the international order--the hierarchical state system--and explores its potential for reform. The theoretical account is given tracing two traditions of thought in the writings of Kant and Rousseau, while the historical survey explores the evolution of international organizations since 1815, covering such aspects as concert diplomacy, alliance systems, international organizations, and such internal understandings as nuclear deterrence, crisis management, and sphere of influence. The Hierarchy of States succeeds and replaces Clark's Reform and Resistance in the International Order (CUP, 1980).
 

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Contents

Order and international relations
13
International and world order
31
Kant and the tradition of optimism
49
Rousseau and the tradition of despair
67
THE PRACTICE OF INTERNATIONAL ORDER
91
Order and change in the international system 18151990
93
From balance to concert 18151854
112
Balance without concert 18561914
131
Concert without balance 19181939
145
From concert to balance 19451990
168
Conclusion
208
Notes
223
Bibliography
239
Index
249
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About the author (1989)

Ian Clark was educated at Glasgow University and Australian National University. He is currently Professor of International Politics at Aberystwyth. A Fellow of the British Academy, he is the author of several books from OUP including Legitimacy in International Society, The Post-Cold War Order,
Globalization and the Theory of International Relations; and Globalization and Fragmentation.

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