The Imperial Animal

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Transaction Publishers, Jan 1, 1997 - Social Science - 308 pages
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This volume offers a compelling perspective on the controversy over humans and their biology. This now-classic study is about the social bonds that hold us together and the antisocial theories that drive us apart. The authors divulge how the evolutionary past of the species, reflected in genetic codes, determines our present and coerces our future. It also give us a direct and intimate look at how we see ourselves. It offers insight into our politics, our ways of learning and teaching, reproducing and producing, playing and fighting.

 

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Contents

Beginning Biogrammar
3
Political Nature
26
Bond Issue One Women and Children First
58
Bond Issue Two Man to Man
87
Give and Take
120
The Benign Oppression
151
Good Grooming
179
The Noble Savage
206
The City of Man
234
Notes
245
Bibliography
257
Index
299
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Page 16 - I do not doubt that they could speak and that theoretically, given time, they or their offspring would invent and develop a language despite their never having been taught one. Furthermore, this language, although totally different from any known to us, would be analyzable by linguists on the same basis as other languages and translatable into all known languages. But I would push this further. If our new Adam and Eve could survive and breed still in total isolation from any cultural influences -...
Page 17 - ... goes against the grain of the anthropological orthodoxy. Without any exposure to cultural traditions our tribe would develop very specific and highly complex patterns of behavior, and probably very quickly — within a matter of a few generations, once they had developed a language. They would do so for the same reason that the baboons produce a baboon social system in captivity — because it is in the beast. And it is not just a very general capacity that is in the beast — not just the capacity...

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