The Language Police: How Pressure Groups Restrict What Students Learn

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Dec 18, 2007 - Education - 288 pages
If you’re an actress or a coed just trying to do a man-size job, a yes-man who turns a deaf ear to some sob sister, an heiress aboard her yacht, or a bookworm enjoying a boy’s night out, Diane Ravitch’s internationally acclaimed The Language Police has bad news for you: Erase those words from your vocabulary!

Textbook publishers and state education agencies have sought to root out racist, sexist, and elitist language in classroom and library materials. But according to Diane Ravitch, a leading historian of education, what began with the best of intentions has veered toward bizarre extremes. At a time when we celebrate and encourage diversity, young readers are fed bowdlerized texts, devoid of the references that give these works their meaning and vitality. With forceful arguments and sensible solutions for rescuing American education from the pressure groups that have made classrooms bland and uninspiring, The Language Police offers a powerful corrective to a cultural scandal.
 

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THE LANGUAGE POLICE: How Pressure Groups Restrict What Students Learn

User Review  - Kirkus

Johnny and Janie can't read, can't find the Pacific on a map, can't even think—all thanks to official censorship that "represents a systemic breakdown of our ability to educate the next generation ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ArmyAngel1986 - LibraryThing

I'm only 5 or 6 chapters into this book, and already she's explained why the textbooks I was forced to read in school were so mind-numbingly boring! I would recommend this book to anyone interested in what schools are teaching. Read full review

Contents

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203
Notes 135
231

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About the author (2007)

Diane Ravitch is a historian of education and Research Professor of Education at New York University and Nonresident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C. She was assistant secretary in charge of research in the U.S. Department of Education in the administration of President George H. W. Bush and was appointed to the National Assessment Governing Board by President Bill Clinton. The author of seven previous books on education, including the critically acclaimed Left Back: A Century of Battles Over School Reform, she lives in Brooklyn, New York.

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