The Lens Within the Heart: The Western Scientific Gaze and Popular Imagery in Later Edo Japan

Front Cover
University of Hawaii Press, 2002 - Social Science - 305 pages
The study of food practices in different cultures and societies has long been an important part of anthropological studies. In recent years anthropological literature on food has generated new theoretical findings on this important aspect of human behavior that help explain cultural adaptation and social grouping in a more general way.In this volume the authors make use of ethnographic examples collected within and beyond the boundaries of China to demonstrate the theoretical relevance of Chinese-inspired foodways, tastes, and consumption.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

I have no idea what the information above is saying--this book has nothing to do with food and very, very little to do with China.
It's about the importation of Western ocular instruments into
Japan in the Edo period (microscopes, telescopes, mirrors, etc.) and the massive changes they helped bring about.
Illustrated well and clearly written, this is an extremely intelligent yet accessible book.
I highly recommend it.
 

Contents

Trade and Culture in the Eighteenth Century
6
The Batavian Temperament and Its Critics
31
Mechanics and Motions
61
Machinery for Pictures
94
Seeing In
133
The Eye and the Lens
166
The View from On High
212
Notes
254
Glossary
288
References
290
Bibliographical Addendum
299
Index
300
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xiii - Linguistics in the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) in the University of London since 1944.

About the author (2002)

Timon Screech is professor in the history of art at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London.

Bibliographic information