The Literary Gazette: A Weekly Journal of Literature, Science, and the Fine Arts

Front Cover
William Jerdan, William Ring Workman, John Morley, Frederick Arnold, Charles Wycliffe Goodwin
H. Colburn, 1835
1 Review
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

nixon

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 113 - And but for that sad shrouded eye, That fires not, wins not, weeps not, now, And but for that chill changeless brow, Where cold Obstruction's apathy Appals the gazing mourner's heart...
Page 90 - And when I shall put thee out, I will cover the heaven, and make the stars thereof dark ; I will cover the sun with a cloud, and the moon shall not give her light. 8 All the bright lights of heaven will I make dark over thee, and set darkness upon thy land, saith the Lord GOD.
Page 90 - And I will make the rivers dry, and sell the land into the hand of the wicked: and I will make the land waste, and all that is therein, by the hand of strangers: I the LORD have spoken it.
Page 220 - There's a human look in its swelling breast, And the gentle curve of its lowly crest; And I often stop with the fear I feel, — He runs so close to the rapid wheel. Whatever is rung on that noisy bell, — Chime of the hour, or funeral knell, — The dove in the belfry must hear it well. When the tongue swings out to the midnight moon, When the sexton cheerly rings for noon, When the clock strikes clear at morning light, When the child is waked with "nine at night...
Page 140 - THE beautiful forest in which we were encamped abounded in bee-trees ; that is to say, trees in the decayed trunks of which wild bees had established their hives. It is surprising in what countless swarms the bees have overspread the Far West, within but a moderate number of years.
Page 140 - At present the honey-bee swarms in myriads in the noble groves and forests that skirt and intersect the prairies, and extend along the alluvial bottoms of the rivers. It seems to me as if these beautiful regions answer literally to the description of the land of promise, " a land flowing with milk and honey...
Page 158 - I reckon it among my principal advantages, as a composer of verses, that I have not read an English poet these thirteen years, and but one these twenty years. Imitation, even of the best models, is my aversion ; it is servile and mechanical...
Page 90 - At Tehaphnehes also the day shall be darkened, when I shall break there the yokes of Egypt : and the pomp of her strength shall cease in her : as for her, a cloud shall cover her, and her daughters shall go into captivity. Thus will I execute judgments in Egypt : and they shall know that I am the Lord.
Page 141 - I wonder that a sportive thought should ever knock at the door of my intellects, and still more that it should gain admittance. It is as if harlequin should intrude himself into the gloomy chamber where a corpse is deposited in state. His antic gesticulations would be unseasonable at any rate, but more especially so if they should distort the features of the mournful attendants into laughter. But the mind, long wearied with the sameness of a dull, dreary prospect, will gladly fix its eyes on any...
Page 136 - Livy. A perpetual effort and struggle is made to supply the place of vigour, garish and dazzling colours are substituted for chaste ornament, and the hideous distortions of weakness for native strength. In my humble opinion, the study of Cowper's prose may, on this account, be as useful in forming the taste of young people as his poetry. " ' That the letters will afford great delight to all persons of true taste, and that you will confer a most acceptable present on the reading world by publishing...

Bibliographic information