The Myths and Legends of Ancient Greece and Rome: being a popular account of Greek and Roman mythology

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Blackie & Son, 1880 - Legends - 330 pages
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Love The Book Tells Of The Real Mythology And Legends

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Nice book
Awesome myths

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Contents

II
11
III
14
IV
18
V
19
VI
21
VII
26
VIII
38
IX
43
LVII
162
LIX
163
LX
164
LXI
165
LXII
170
LXIII
171
LXIV
174
LXV
175

X
48
XII
50
XIII
58
XIV
61
XV
67
XVI
68
XVII
85
XVIII
86
XIX
87
XX
97
XXI
101
XXII
107
XXIII
108
XXV
109
XXVI
110
XXVII
111
XXIX
112
XXXI
114
XXXII
117
XXXIV
124
XXXV
130
XXXVI
137
XXXIX
138
XL
139
XLI
141
XLII
142
XLIII
143
XLIV
144
XLV
145
XLVI
146
XLVII
147
XLVIII
149
LI
150
LII
154
LIII
155
LIV
156
LV
157
LXVI
176
LXVII
178
LXVIII
180
LXXI
181
LXXIII
182
LXXVII
183
LXXIX
184
LXXXII
185
LXXXIV
187
LXXXV
188
LXXXVI
190
LXXXVII
191
LXXXIX
192
XC
194
XCI
195
XCII
196
XCV
197
XCVII
199
XCVIII
200
C
201
CII
203
CIII
205
CIV
210
CV
211
CVI
213
CVII
232
CVIII
234
CIX
256
CX
259
CXI
269
CXII
272
CXIII
276
CXIV
277
CXV
280
CXVI
283
CXVII
304

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Page 195 - ... was a wife childless? What career should a son pursue? States, too, sent to seek advice on questions of policy. There was endless variety. More often than not the response was couched in a distinctly cryptic style, sometimes susceptible of a double interpretation. One monarch, for instance, was told that, if he crossed a certain river, he would destroy a great empire, and optimistically crossing it, he destroyed his own.
Page 333 - These Books have been compiled by a number of practical Teachers who have conducted schools of different grades with marked success for upwards of twenty years. They have worked in concert, and thus the experience of each one has been utilized for the benefit of the whole. Illustrated in a higJdy instructive and artistic manner.
Page 334 - The object of this book is to place in the hands of students and practical men a concise guide to the objects, construction and use of the indicator, and to the interpretation of indicator diagrams. Lengthy discussion of theoretical or hypothetical matters has been avoided. The behaviour of steam and its expansion under different conditions have been...
Page 1 - In endeavouring to supply this want I have sought to place before the reader a lifelike picture of the deities of classical times as they were conceived and worshipped by the ancients themselves, and thereby to awaken in the minds of young students a desire to become more intimately acquainted with the noble productions of classical antiquity.
Page 259 - Chimaera, a dangerous monster that devastated the land. The fore part of its body was that of a lion, the centre that of a goat, and the hinder part that of a dragon. According to Hesiod, it had three heads — that of a lion, a goat, and a dragon. According to the same poet, the Chimaera was a fire-breathing monster of great swiftness and strength, the daughter of Typhon and Echidna.
Page 66 - ... and flows northeastward toward northern Europe. It broadens rapidly and joins forces with the western part of the great Atlantic eddy. In crossing the Atlantic, the drift is pushed along by the prevailing westerlies, so that it reaches the shores of northern Europe, and even enters the Arctic Ocean. Some idea of its size may be gained from the fact that it carries many times as much water as all the rivers of the world.
Page 190 - As to the form of these antient structures, they were built after that manner which was thought most agreeable to the gods to whom they were designed to be dedicated : for as trees, birds, and other animals were esteemed...
Page 87 - See page vii. 87 chariot across the sky whilst her brother was reposing after the toils of the day. When the shades of evening began to enfold the earth, the two milk-white steeds of Selene rose out of the mysterious depths of Oceanus. Seated in a silvery chariot, and accompanied by her daughter Herse, the goddess of the dew, appeared the mild and gentle queen of the night, with a crescent on her fair brow, a gauzy veil flowing behind, and a lighted torch in her hand. Selene greatly admired a beautiful...
Page 25 - Prometheus, however, resolved to brave the anger of the great ruler of Olympus, and to obtain from heaven the vital spark so necessary for the further progress and comfort of the human race. He accordingly contrived to steal some sparks from the chariot of the sun, which he conveyed to earth hidden in a hollow tube. Furious at being again outwitted, Zeus determined to be revenged first on mankind, and then on Prometheus. To punish the former he commanded Hephsestus (Vulcan) to mould a beautiful woman...
Page 185 - Unrest, 1910, blzz. 24—36. 22 op de godsdienstige instellingen, die de Hindoesche wereld in sterke mate beheerschen. „For the Hindu", zegt CHIROL, „perhaps more than for any other, religion governs life from the hour of his birth to that of his death. His birth and his death are in fact only links in a long chain of existences inexorably governed by religion. His religion may seem to us to consist chiefly of ritual and ceremonial observances which sterilize any higher spiritual life. But even...

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