The Narrow Road to the Deep North, and Other Travel Sketches

Front Cover
Penguin, 1966 - Poetry - 167 pages
In later life Basho turned to Zen Buddhism, and the travel sketched in this volume relfect his attempts to cast off earthly attachments and reach out to spiritual fulfillment. The sketches are written in the "haibun" style--a linking of verse and prose. The title piece, in particular, reveals Basho striving to discover a vision of eternity in the transient world around him and his personal evocation of the mysteries of the universe.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Banoo - LibraryThing

Matsuo Basho was a poet. He traveled throughout Japan. He wrote poems about it... and short essays. Prose and poetry mix. It is a beautiful thing when the two meet seamlessly. ...it was a great ... Read full review

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User Review  - revliz - LibraryThing

A funny meditative little book. Read full review

Contents

III
51
IV
65
V
91
VI
97
VII
146
VIII
147
IX
149
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About the author (1966)

Basho, the Japanese poet and diarist, was born in Iga-ueno near Kyoto in 1644. He spent his youth as companion to the son of the local lord, and with him he studied the writing of seventeen-syllable verse. In 1667 he moved to Edo (now Tokyo) where he continued to write verse. He eventually became a recluse, living on the outskirts of Edo in a hut. When he traveled he relied entirely on the hospitality of temples and fellow-poets. In his writings he was strongly influenced by the Zen sect of Buddhism.

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