The Nature of Grief: The Evolution and Psychology of Reactions to Loss

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Routledge, Sep 2, 2003 - Psychology - 336 pages
The Nature of Grief is a provocative new study on the evolution of grief. Most literature on the topic regards grief either as a psychiatric disorder or illness to be cured. In contrast to this, John Archer shows that grief is a natural reaction to losses of many sorts, even to the death of a pet, and he proves this by bringing together material from evolutionary psychology, ethology and experimental psychology.
This innovative new work will be required reading for developmental and clinical psychologists and all those in the caring professions.

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Contents

1 Introduction
1
2 The historical background to grief research
11
3 Accounts of grief from other sources
27
4 The biological context of grief
45
5 The grief process
65
6 The grief process
91
7 The resolution of grief
107
8 The mental processes of grief
129
10 The relationship with the deceased
165
11 Loss of a son or daughter
179
12 Death of a relative or friend
205
13 The influence of the age and sex of the bereaved
231
14 Conclusions
247
References
253
Author index
293
Subject index
305

9 An evolutionary view of individual differences in grief
149

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