The Panama Papers: Breaking the Story of How the Rich and Powerful Hide Their Money

Front Cover
Oneworld Publications, Apr 11, 2017 - True Crime - 400 pages
From the winners of the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting

11.5 million documents sent through encrypted channels. The secret records of 214,000 offshore companies. The largest data leak in history.

In early 2015, an anonymous whistle-blower led investigative journalists Bastian Obermayer and Frederik Obermaier into the shadow economy where the super-rich hide billions of dollars in complex financial networks. Thus began the ground-breaking investigation that saw an international team of 400 journalists work in secret for a year to uncover cases involving heads of state, politicians, businessmen, big banks, the mafia, diamond miners, art dealers and celebrities. A real-life thriller, The Panama Papers is the gripping account of how the story of the century was exposed to the world.

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
3
4 stars
4
3 stars
2
2 stars
0
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Paul_S - LibraryThing

Fucking painful to read, not because of style but because of the contents. It's more annoying than reading about it in the news when it was happening because back then we still thought it would have an effect. Now it's purely of educational value. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - stillatim - LibraryThing

'Reads like a thriller,' meaning it's fast paced, shallow, interesting, uninformative, and atrociously translated. For goodness sake, one just doesn't use the historical present in English! A great project, but a mediocre book. Read full review

Other editions - View all

About the author (2017)

Frederik Obermaier and Bastian Obermayer are award-winning investigative journalists at Süddeutsche Zeitung, Germany’s largest broadsheet. The first people to have access to the Panama Papers, they were previously part of the international team of journalists who revealed the Offshore Leaks, Luxembourg Leaks and Swiss Leaks. In 2017, they received the Pulitzer Prize in Explanatory Reporting, and were finalists in International Reporting.

Bibliographic information