The Pathology of Normalcy

Front Cover
American Mental Health Foundation Books, 2010 - Philosophy - 152 pages
The Pathology of Normalcy examines the very definitions of mental health and mental sickness in modern-day society. Sections consist of lectures about frame of reference when evaluating mental health, the intersection of alienation and mental health issues, and even the interplay between psychological and economic theory, as he deconstructs the weaknesses of Marxist Socialism and explains why it has been largely rejected in modern America. Of particular interest is the self-evident section Is Man Lazy by Nature?, which strives to understand how humankind can best overcome its own tendencies toward inertia. [The American Mental Health Foundation's Fromm titles] are timely, directly relevant to modern psychological and social issues, and bring absolutely invaluable humanist messages to temper psychology's scientific and healing discipline. Highly recommended, especially for college library collections. --Midwest Book Review A brilliant meditation on mental health in the modern world; alienation and mental health; ways to overcome "the insane society"; a comprehensive analysis of prevailing concepts of mental health against Fromm's views on overcoming destructive narcissism and social determinants of mental health; and a look at humankind's alleged passivity in relation to dreams, child development, and psychology.

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About the author (2010)

Psychologist and philosopher Erich Fromm was born in Frankfurt, Germany on March 23, 1900. He received a Ph.D in sociology from the University of Heidelberg in 1922 and finished his psychoanalytical training at the Psychoanalytical Institute in Berlin in 1930. He started his own clinical practice and joined the Frankfurt Institute for Social Research. In 1934, he moved to New York and became a professor at Columbia University. In 1950, he moved to Mexico City and became a professor at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico, where he created a psychoanalytic section at the medical school. He retired from there in 1965 and moved to Muralto, Switzerland in 1974. Throughout his life, Fromm maintained a clinical practice and wrote books. His writings were notable for both their social and political commentary and their philosophical and psychological underpinnings. He became known for linking human personality types with socioeconomic and political structures. His most popular book, The Art of Loving, was first published in 1956 and became an international bestseller. He died on March 18, 1980.

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