The Phantom World: Or, The Philosophy of Spirits, Apparitions, &c, Volume 1

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R. Bentley, 1850 - Angels
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Page 271 - ... me, after their decease; and what they told me happened. Was it their soul which appeared to me, or was it some other spirit which assumed their form ?" He concludes from this, that the soul is not absolutely bodiless, since God alone is incorporeal. St. Augustine, who was consulted on this matter by Evodius, does not think that the soul, after the death of the body, is clothed with any material substantial form; but he confesses that it is very difficult to explain how an infinite number of...
Page 96 - In those days was Hezekiah sick unto death. And the prophet Isaiah the son of Amoz came to him, and said unto him, Thus saith the Lord, Set thine house in order; for thou shalt die, and not live.
Page 141 - St. Richard, Abbot of S. Vanne de Verdun, appeared in 1036 elevated from the ground while he was saying mass in presence of the Duke Galizon, his sons, and a great number of lords and soldiers. In the last century, the reverend Father Dominic Carme De'chaux, was raised from the ground before the King of Spain, the queen, and all the court, so that they had only to blow upon his body to move it about like a soap-bubble.
Page 137 - We have, in history,' says Calmet, ' several instances of persons full of religion and piety, who, in the fervor of their orisons, have been taken up into the air, and remained there for some time. We have known a good monk who rises sometimes from the ground, and remains suspended without wishing it, without seeking to do so, especially on seeing some devotional image, or on hearing some devout prayer, such as "Gloria in excelsis Deo.
Page 137 - World," p. 75. orisons, have been taken up into the air, and have remained there for some time. We have known a good monk, who rises sometimes from the ground, and remains suspended, without wishing it.
Page 164 - As she would not listen to his addresses, he first of all gave her philters to make her love him, which occasioned strange derangement in her health. At last he gave her some magical medicaments. The physicians could not relieve her, and were quite at fault with her extraordinary maladies. " After having tried all sorts of remedies, they were obliged to have recourse to exorcisms. This treatment commenced 2d September, 1619, in the town of Remiremont, whence she was transferred to Nancy ; there she...
Page 271 - I remember well that Profuturus, Privatus and Servitius, whom I had known in the monastery here, appeared to me, and talked with me after their decease ; and what they told me, happened. Was it their soul which appeared to me, or was it some other spirit which assumed their form?" He concludes from this that the soul is not absolutely bodiless, since God alone is incorporeal.h St.
Page 133 - Daniel in the lions' den. St. Paul informs us that he was carried up to the third heaven, and that he heard ineffable things; but he owns that he does not know whether it was in the body or only in the spirit. He therefore doubted not the possibility of a man's being transported in body and soul through the air. The deacon St. Philip was transported from the road from Gaza to Azotus in a very little time by the Spirit of God.
Page 273 - Do you know that now you see nothing with the eyes of your body ?" "I know it," answered he. "Well, then, with what eyes do you behold me?" As he hesitated, and knew not what to reply, the young man said to him, " In the same way that you see and hear me now that your eyes are shut, and your senses asleep ; thus, after your death, you will live, you will see, you will hear, but with eyes of the spirit; so doubt not that there is another life after the present one.
Page 140 - One of the oldest instances of persons thus raised from the ground without any one raising them, is that of St. Dunstan, Archbishop of Canterbury, who died in 988, and who, a little time before his death, as he was going up stairs to his apartment, accompanied by several persons, was observed to rise from the ground: and as all present were astonished at the circumstance, he took occasion to speak of his approaching death. In 1036, Richard Abbot of S.

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