The Philosophy of Vegetarianism

Front Cover
Univ of Massachusetts Press, 1984 - Medical - 188 pages

The idea that it is morally wrong to eat animals held sway for about one thousand years among some of the most prominent ancient Greek philosophers, including Pythagoras, Empedocles, Theophrastus, Plotinus, Plutarch, Porphyry, and, perhaps, Plato. The idea then died out for almost seventeen-hundred years. Since the 1970s, however, there has been a resurgence of interest in vegetarianism, marked by lively debates and the emergence of a substantial literature in the form of scholarly books and articles.

Daniel A. Dombrowski uses the tools and insights of these contemporary debates in order to better understand the strengths and weaknesses of ancient philosophical vegetarianism. He also uses the wisdom of the Greek vegetarians as an Archimedean point from which to critique both the opponents and the defenders of contemporary philosophical vegetarianism. The book includes an annotated bibliography of the current debates in this burgeoning field of scholarship.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The Golden Age
19
The Pythagoreans
35
Socrates through Theophrastus
55
The Hellenistic Era the Romans and Plutarch
75
The Neoplatonists
103
Arete Rorty and Hartshorne
121
Notes
141
Bibliography
167
Index
185
Copyright

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Page 16 - But a full-grown horse or dog is beyond comparison a more rational, as well as a more conversable animal, than an infant of a day, or a week, or even a month, old. But suppose they were otherwise, what would it avail? The question is not, Can they reason? nor Can they talk? but, Can they suffer'?

About the author (1984)

Assistant professor of philosophy at Creighton University, Daniel A. Dombrowski is author of Plato's Philosophy of History.

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