The Problem of China

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Cosimo, Inc., Dec 1, 2007 - History - 260 pages
The Problem of China, originally published in 1922, is Bertrand Russell's analysis of China's place in the world and its place in the future development of society. It was evident that China would become a major force in international affairs, according to Russell, because the population of the country makes up a major portion of the population of the world. In studying the "problem" of China, Russell breaks his inquiry down into cultural, economic, and political questions. He believes that China, a country whose "virtues are chiefly useful to others and vices chiefly harm to [itself]," would come to a cultural crossroads, and that the choices the country made would affect the economic and political make up of the entire world. Russell's insights of nearly a century ago are still relevant to readers today who wish to understand the Chinese mind and develop an appreciation for how China came to its place in the world today. British philosopher and mathematician BERTRAND ARTHUR WILLIAM RUSSELL (1872-1970) won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1950. Among his many works are Why I Am Not a Christian (1927), Power: A New Social Analysis (1938), and My Philosophical Development (1959).
 

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User Review  - dcunning11235 - LibraryThing

This was a very interesting read for a number of reasons. It is a fairly concise analysis of the then-present political and economic situation of China, as viewed by a visiting Professor Bertrand ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - dcunning11235 - LibraryThing

This was a very interesting read for a number of reasons. It is a fairly concise analysis of the then-present political and economic situation of China, as viewed by a visiting Professor Bertrand ... Read full review

Contents

I
9
II
21
III
48
IV
63
V
86
VI
97
VII
117
VIII
130
X
159
XI
185
XII
199
XIII
214
XIV
226
XV
240
XVI
253
XVII
256

IX
149

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About the author (2007)

Bertrand Arthur William Russell (1872-1970) was a British philosopher, logician, essayist and social critic. He was best known for his work in mathematical logic and analytic philosophy. Together with G.E. Moore, Russell is generally recognized as one of the main founders of modern analytic philosophy. Together with Kurt Gödel, he is regularly credited with being one of the most important logicians of the twentieth century. Over the course of a long career, Russell also made contributions to a broad range of subjects, including the history of ideas, ethics, political and educational theory, and religious studies. General readers have benefited from his many popular writings on a wide variety of topics. After a life marked by controversy--including dismissals from both Trinity College, Cambridge, and City College, New York--Russell was awarded the Order of Merit in 1949 and the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1950. Noted also for his many spirited anti-nuclear protests and for his campaign against western involvement in the Vietnam War, Russell remained a prominent public figure until his death at the age of 97.

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