The Provenance of the Pseudepigrapha: Jewish, Christian, Or Other?

Front Cover
BRILL, 2005 - Religion - 278 pages
The Old Testament pseudepigrapha are ancient quasi-biblical texts inspired by the Hebrew Bible. Although frequently mined as Jewish background by New Testament specialists, they were transmitted almost entirely in Christian circles, often only in translation. Christian authors wrote some pseudepigrapha and did not necessarily always mention explicitly Christian topics. This book challenges the assumption that pseudepigrapha are Jewish compositions until proven otherwise. It proposes a methodology for understanding them first in the social context of their earliest manuscripts, inferring still earlier origins only as required by positive evidence while considering the full range of possible authors (Jews, Christians, "God-fearers," Samaritans, etc.). It analyzes a substantial corpus of pseudepigrapha, distinguishing those that are probably Jewish from those of more doubtful origins.
 

Contents

introduction Establishing the Origins ofOld Testament Pseudepigrapha
2
chapter one Jewish Pseudepigrapha and Christian
10
How Can We Tell Them Apart?
11
Section3 21 Section4 Early Christianity and the Parting of the Ways
21
Proselytes GodFearers
23
Section 6 Jewish Christianity andJudaizing Gentile Christianity Sympathizers and SyncretisticJews
38
Section7 Non or QuasiJewish Israelites
50
Section 8 The Range of Possibilities
59
Section4 Christian Works with Episodes That Lack Any Christian Signature Signature Features Features
95
Section5 A Probable Christian Work That Lacks Any Christian Signature Features
111
Section 6 Conclusions
115
chapter three Jewish Pseudepigrapha
120
  excursus Observations on Philo andJosephus
164
chapter four Some Pseudepigrapha ofDebatable Origin
180
  excursus Observations on the Old Testament Apocrypha
217
chapter five Conclusions
228

Methodological Proposals
64
Section 10 Conclusions
71
chapter two Did Christians Write Old Testament Pseudepigrapha That Appear to Be Jewish?
74
Section2 Some Preliminary Questions Pseudepigrapha
77
Section3 Christian Works with Only a Few Easily Excisable Christian
84

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About the author (2005)

James R. Davila, Ph.D., Harvard University, is Lecturer in Early Jewish Studies at the University of St. Andrews, Scotland, and the author of Liturgical Works (Eerdmans, 2000) and Descenders to the Chariot: The People behind the Hekhalot Literature (Brill, 2003).