The Two Koreas: A Contemporary History

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Basic Books, Dec 10, 2013 - History - 512 pages
An acclaimed history of the Korean Peninsula from World War II to the present day

North Korea is an impoverished, famine-ridden nation, but it is also a nuclear power whose dictator Kim Jong-un regularly threatens his neighbors and adversaries, the United States in particular, with destruction. Even though Kim and President Donald Trump's responses to him dominate the daily headlines, the idea that North Korea is a menace is not a new one. Indeed, ever since Korea was first divided at the end of World War II, the tension between its northern and southern halves has riveted-and threatened to embroil -- the rest of the world. In this landmark history, veteran journalist Don Oberdorfer and Korea expert Robert Carlin grippingly describe how a historically homogenous people became locked in a perpetual struggle for supremacy -- and how other nations including the United States have tried, and failed, to broker a lasting peace.
 

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User Review  - xuebi - LibraryThing

Oberdorfer writes here a comprehensive and detailed modern history of North and South Korea, their relations both domestic and foreign, and the transformations both countries have undergone since the ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - cwhouston - LibraryThing

This book provides excellent and engaging coverage of the political history of the two states since the split, with particular reference to their relationship with each other, the USSR, China and the ... Read full review

Contents

ASSASSINATION AND AFTERMATH
TERROR AND TALK
THE BATTLE FOR DEMOCRACY IN SEOUL
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Don Oberdorfer wrote for the Washington Post for twenty-five years, and was later on the Chairman of the U.S.-Korea Institute at Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. He died in 2015.

Robert Carlin is a Visiting Fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University and former chief of the Northeast Asia Division in the Bureau of Intelligence and Research, U.S. Department of State. He lives in Washington, D.C.

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