The Categorical Imperative: A Study in Kant's Moral Philosophy

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University of Pennsylvania Press, Oct 1, 1971 - Philosophy - 283 pages
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A classic exposition of Kant's ethical thought.

 

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Contents

REFERENCES AND ABBREVIATIONS
13
PREFACE
15
BOOK I
16
THE APPROACH TO THE CATEGORICAL IMPERATIVE THE CRITICAL METHOD I The need for understanding Kants method
19
Moral judgements are a priori
20
The marks of a priori judgement
21
Composite knowledge
22
The task of philosophy
23
Argument from the character of a good will
177
The exclusion of pathological interest
182
The application of Formula HI
183
Summary
184
THE FORMULA OF AUTONOMY
185
The approach to Formula IIla
186
The kingdom of ends
187
The supreme head
188

The need for pure ethics
24
The method of analysis
25
Analytic and synthetic arguments
26
The Critical method
27
The method of synthesis
29
The Divisions of Kants Moral Philo sophy
31
THE GOOD WILL 1 A good will is good without limitation 54
34
Other possible views
35
Are many goods good without limitation?
38
Is a good will good without limitation?
39
The highest good
41
A good will and its objects
43
The function of reason
44
Goodness is fundamental
45
DUTY
46
THE MAXIM OF MORALITY
58
MISUNDERSTANDINGS
74
Moral interest 256
75
Morality
88
TH E GOOD
103
IMPERATIVES 1 Imperatives in general
113
Definition of an imperative
114
Rules counsels and laws
115
Obligation and goodness
116
The duty to act morally
117
HOW ARE IMPERATIVES POSSIBLE? 1 The meaning of the question
120
Synthetic propositions
122
Difficulties
123
Synthetic propositions are presupposed
125
Imperatives of prudence are analytic propositions
126
Categorical imperatives are synthetic a priori pro
127
positions
128
BOOK III
129
The relations between the five formulae
130
The application of the formulae
131
THE FORMULA OP UNIVERSAL LAW 1 Formula I
133
The one categorical imperative
134
Universal law
135
Material maxims
137
Contradiction in the will
139
The rational will as arbiter
140
The permissible and the obligatory
141
The Spontaneity of Mind 1 Intellectual spontaneity
142
Aesthetic spontaneity
144
Perfect and imperfect duties
147
The causal law of nature
148
Teleological law in nature
149
The perfection of nature
150
Kindness I52 8 Promises to repay loans
152
Suicide
154
Culture
155
The principles of moral action
156
The Law of Nature as a Type of the Moral Law 1 The form of law
157
The problem ofexhibition
158
Symbolic exhibition
159
The type of moral law
160
The natural order
161
Practical exhibition
162
THE FORMULA OF THE END IN ITSELF 1 Formula II
165
The nature of ends
166
Ends in themselves
167
Grounds and ends
169
The approach to Formula II
170
Kinds of duty
171
Kants illustrations i72 8 The soundness of Kants view
173
Special characteristics of Formula II
175
Argument from the nature of rational agents
176
The kingdom of nature
190
The realisation of the kingdom of ends
191
The application of Formula IIla
192
Moral progress
194
Kants historical background
195
Formula III 18o 2 The approach to Formula III 181
196
Kants personality
197
BOOK IV
199
An alternative question
201
The purpose of a transcendental deduction
202
A different view
203
Possible misunderstandings
204
Kants method
206
FREEDOM AND AUTONOMY 1 Kant as a pioneer
207
Will as causality
208
Freedom and natural necessity
209
The positive concept of freedom
211
Freedom and autonomy
212
Is only a good will free?
213
Two kinds of heteronomy
214
Degrees of freedom
215
FREEDOM A3 A NECESSARY PRESUPPOSITION 1 Freedom and rational agents
217
Theoretical reason and its presupposition
218
The selfconsciousness of reason
220
The position of the argument
221
THE INTELLIGIBLE WORLD 1 Side issues
223
The alleged vicious circle
224
The way of escape
225
The two standpoints
226
The argument from the passivity of sense
228
Other arguments
230
Conclusion
231
MEMBERSHIP OF THE INTELLIGIBLE WORLD 1 Inner sense and mental states
233
The noumenal self
234
3 The mind affects itself
235
4 Knowledge of mental activity
236
5 The activity of reason
238
Membership of the 1ntelligible world
240
HOW is A CATEGORICAL IMPERATIVE POSSIBLE? I The deduction
242
3 The conclusion
243
4 The failure of the deduction
244
5 Direct insight into the principle ot autonomy
245
Is the principle of autonomy analytic?
246
The objective principles of reason
247
9 Reason and the unconditioned
249
Kants Additional Argument
250
SOME FURTHER QUESTIONS 1 Further questions to be considered
253
The conflict of reason and desire
255
Interest and obligation
258
Modern intellectual ism
259
Kants teleology
261
The selfconsciousness of practical reason
262
Thought and action 963
263
Some practical objections
265
THE DEFENCE OF FREEDOM 1 The antinomy of freedom and necessity
266
The two standpoints
267
How is freedom possible?
268
Phenomena and noumena
269
The thought of the intelligible world
271
There is no explanation of freedom
273
Freedom to act badly
275
Freedom and necessity
276
The defence of freedom
277
INDEX OF PROPER NAMES
279
Ethics and metaphysics 255
280
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About the author (1971)

H. J. Paton was the author of several books, including Kant's Metaphysic of Experience and The Good Will.

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