The comic romance of Monsieur Scarron, Volume 1

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Printed for W. Griffin, 1775 - Literary Criticism
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Page 112 - My father and mother loved him tenderly, and had an aversion for me, though I was the more hopeful boy of the two. There appeared nothing but what was mean in him. As for me, I seemed to be what I was not, and rather an earl's son than...
Page 96 - ... the volume should swell to the bigness of that of the Grand Cyrus : and if from what he has read he doubts what will follow, perhaps I am in the same quandary as well as he. For one chapter draws on another, and I do with my book as some do with their horses, putting the bridle on their necks, and trusting to their good conduct. But perhaps I have a...
Page 233 - Roquebrune was not of the same opinion. He affirmed very positively that there could be no pleasure in reading romances unless they contained the adventures of princes, nay, and of great princes too, and that for that reason, " Astrea " only pleased him here and there. " In what histories can one find kings and emperors enough to make new romances ? " said the counselor. "We must feign them," replied Roquebrune, "as they usually do in fabulous stories, which have no foundation in history.
Page 6 - La Rappiniere by name, made up to them, and with the authority of a magistrate, asked them who they were. The young man, whom I described before, without offering to pull off his turban (because with one hand he held his gun, and with the other the hilt of his sword, lest it should beat against his legs), answered him that they were Frenchmen by birth, and players by profession : that his stage name was Destiny ; his old comrade's Rancour ; and the gentlewoman (who sat roosting like a hen on the...
Page 59 - Neither do I care to imitate the writers of romances, who mark with great exactness all the hours of the day, and make their heroes rise betimes, relate their adventures by dinner-time, eat but little at dinner, then resume the story after dinner, or retire into the thickest part of a wood, in order to entertain their own selves, unless when they have something to say to...
Page 36 - Rancour a fhare of his bed; which the ftroller, with fome faint expreffions of gratitude, accepted. The merchant having called for fupper, the landlord, as ufual, kept him company ; and Rancour, without much entreaty, putting in for a third, began to drink upon a new fcore. Their converfation turned moftly upon politics, taxes, and the national debt; they damned monopolies, drank confufion to excifemen, fettled the miniftry, and unfettled their own brains fo much...
Page 196 - In the meantime the actresses went home to their inn with a numerous attendance of citizens. Ragotin happening to be near Cave as she came out of the tennis-court where they had acted, offered her his hand to lead her home, though he would rather have paid that civil office to his dear Star ; he did the like to Angelica, so that he was squire upon the right and left. This double civility occasioned a treble inconveniency ; for Cave, who had the upper hand, as in all reason she ought, was crowded...

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