The history of Castle Bytham

Front Cover
Henry Johnson, 1871 - Castle Bytham (England) - 139 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 40 - ... put them in prison for their gold and silver, and tortured them with pains unspeakable, for never were any martyrs tormented as these were.
Page 41 - In many of the castles were (instruments called) a ' loathly and grim ;' these were neck-bonds, of which two or three men had enough to bear one. It was so made, that is (it was) fastened to a beam ; and they put a sharp iron about the man's throat and his neck, so that he could not in any direction sit, or lie, or sleep, but must bear all that iron.
Page 95 - Treatise on the Doctrine of the Greek Article, applied to the Criticism and the Illustration of the New Testament ; " and the following year, " Christ divided ; a Sermon preached at the Visitation of the Lord Bishop of Lincoln.
Page 40 - They seized those whom they supposed to have any goods, men, and labouring women, and threw them into prison, for their gold and silver, and inflicted on them unutterable tortures. Some they hanged up by the feet, and smoked with foul smoke ; some by the thumbs or by the beard, and hung coats of mail on their feet. They put them into dungeons with adders, and snakes, and toads.
Page 99 - Notes taken in the church, 23 July, 1833 — A white marble tablet on the north wall of the chancel : Sacred | to the memory of | Helen Jenkyns | daughter of | the Rev. Samuel Elsdale, MA, | (Master of the Free Grammar school in this parish), | and Catherine his wife. | She died on the 9th March 1818. | She was a most heavenly minded, tender hearted child, | ever dutiful to her parents, loving & beloved. | The Lord gave & the...
Page 41 - Sachenteges," of which two or three men had enough to bear one. It was thus made: that is, fastened to a beam; and they placed a sharp iron [collar] about the man's throat and neck, so that he could in no direction either sit, or lie, or sleep, but bear all that iron. Many thousands they wore out with hunger. I neither can, nor may I tell all the wounds and all the pains which they inflicted on wretched men in this land.
Page 40 - Then took they those whom they supposed to have any goods, both by night and by day, labouring men and women, and threw them into prison for their gold and silver, and inflicted on them unutterable tortures; for never were any martyrs so tortured as they were. Some they hanged up by the feet, and smoked them with foul smoke; and some by the thumbs, or by the head, and hung coats of mail on their feet. They tied knotted strings about their heads, and twisted them till the pain went to the brains....
Page 8 - England," remarks, that castles walled with stone, and designed for residence as well as defence, are for the most part of no higher antiquity than the conquest ; for...
Page 40 - ... the reign of Stephen, the Saxon Chronicle informs us, in the following words, as translated by Ingram : — " They (that is, the Norman nobles) cruelly oppressed the wretched men of the land with castle works, and when the castles were made they filled them with devils and evil men ; then took they those whom they supposed to have any goods, both by night and day, men and women, and threw them into prison for their gold and silver, and inflicted on them unutterable tortures, for never were any...
Page 14 - It was a ship's mast fixed on a wagon and bearing, high above the banners of St. Peter, St. John of Beverley and St. Wilfrid of Ripon, the sacred Host, that God might be with the army, as on the day of Hastings.

Bibliographic information