The Riches of a Hop-garden Explain'd, from the Several Improvements Arising by that Beneficial Plant ..: With the Observations and Remarks of the Most Celebrated Hop-planters in Britain ..

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Charles Davis ... and Thomas Green, 1729 - Hops - 104 pages
 

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Page 15 - After this I beheld, and lo, a great multitude, which no man could number, of all nations and kindreds and people and tongues, stood before the throne, and before the Lamb, clothed with white robes, and palms in their hands ; And cried with a loud voice; saying; Salvation to our God which sitteth upon the throne, and unto the Lamb.
Page 15 - And all the angels stood round about the throne, and about the elders and the four beasts, and fell before the throne on their faces and worshipped God, saying, Amen, blessing, and glory, and wisdom, and thanksgiving, and honor, and power, and might, be unto our God for ever and ever, Amen.
Page 15 - And he said to me, These are they which came out of great tribulation, and have washed their robes, and made them white in the blood of the Lamb. 15 Therefore are they before the throne of God, and serve him day and night in his temple: and he that sitteth on the throne shall dwell among them. 16 They shall hunger no more, neither thirst any more; neither shall the sun light on them, nor any heat. 17 For the Lamb which is in the midst of the throne shall feed them, and shall lead them unto living...
Page cviii - As to himself, he banished deer from his park as an unprofitable luxury, and supplied its place with black cattle and sheep, of which great numbers were always to be seen in his domain. For his oddities, those visitors who knew him well, made a due allowance, but in strangers who saw him for the first time, the uncouth appearance of his person, and the singularity of his manners never failed to excite uncommon sensations. It was probably about this time that Mr. Robinson first permitted his beard...
Page cxii - Kent, on their petition for removing from the councils of his Majesty his present ministers, and for adopting proper means to procure a speedy and a happy peace ; together with a postscript concerning the treaty between the Emperor of Germany and France, and concerning our domestic situation in time to come.
Page cxi - Nature was not, in any respect, checked by art, and the animals of every class were left in the same state of perfect freedom, and were seen bounding through his pastures with uncommon spirit and energy. His singularities caused many ridiculous stories to be circulated concerning him, and among others that he would not...
Page cvii - Impressed with the sense of the impropriety of any longer occupying a seat in Parliament, when he could neither discharge its duties with fidelity to his constituents, nor with satisfaction to himself, he addressed a letter to the inhabitants of Canterbury, in which he took an affectionate leave of them; and he is reported to have said to one of the principal citizens, " that they ought to chuse as his successor, a younger and more vigorous man; one who had eyes to see, ears to hear, and lungs to...
Page cx - ... end. He had just come out of the water, and was dressed in an old blue woollen coat, and pantaloons of the same colour. The upper part of his head was bald, but the hair on his chin, which could not be concealed even by the posture he had assumed, made its appearance between his arms on each side.
Page cx - The upper part of his head was bald, but the hair on his chin, which could not be concealed even by the posture he had assumed, made its appearance between his arms on each side. I immediately retired, and waited at a little distance until he awoke ; when rising, he opened the door, darted through the thicket, accompanied by his dogs, and made directly for the house...
Page cviii - He planted, improved, and embellished" house was open to all respectable strangers, and he was much visited on account of the singularity of his manners, and the shrewdness of his remarks. He was a great friend to agriculture, and in him his tenants found a most excellent landlord. As to himself, he banished deer from his park as an unprofitable luxury, and...

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