Threads of Knowledge: Drawn from a Cambric Handkerchief, a Brussels Carpet, a Print Dress, a Kid Glove, a Sheet of Paper

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Cassell, Petter, & Galpin, 1872 - Industrial arts - 166 pages
 

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Page 58 - fleece was ours, the golden theirs, so vast their emolument from the trade of " clothing. Our king therefore resolved, if possible, to revive the trade of his own " country, who as yet were ignorant of that art, as knowing no more what to do " with their wooll than the sheep that weare it...
Page 60 - No more — but hasten to thy tasks at home, There guide the spindle, and direct the loom: Me glory summons to the martial scene, The field of combat is the sphere for men. Where heroes war, the foremost place I claim, The first in danger as the first in fame.
Page 72 - ... and in the cloths so operated on there is not the smallest appearance of any dye or tincture. These cloths are then put in a...
Page 72 - This is indeed a wonderful process, seeing that there is in the said caldron only one kind of coloring material ; yet from it the cloth acquires this and that color, and the boiling liquor itself also changes according to the quality and nature of the dye-absorbing drugs which were at first laid on the white cloth...
Page 52 - Our fathers to the house of God, As yet a building rude, Bore offerings from the flowery sod, And fragrant rushes strew'd. May we, their children, ne'er forget The pious lesson given, But honour still, together met, The Lord of earth and heaven. Sing we the good Creator's praise, Who gives us aun and showers To cheer our hearts with fruitful days, And deck our world with flowers.
Page 50 - Moore set up a manufactory, and obtained a premium in 1757 from the Society of Arts for the best imitation of a Turkey carpet. But these carpets were very expensive.
Page 140 - Discourse of Paper, and the benefits it brings, with the setting forth of a paper mill built near Dartford by a High German, called Mr. Spilman, jeweller to the Queen.
Page 51 - ... viz. two yards long and one broad, with a narrow blue or black border. It was only at Edo in the imperial palace that I saw mats larger than these.
Page 22 - Heilman, of Alsace, a considerable fortune in fruitless efforts to bring it to perfection. Disheartened and nearly destitute, he returned to his native place to visit his family, and whilst sitting by the fire, happening to turn round, perceived one of his daughters combing her hair, when an idea struck him. He had found that which was wanting, and to this simple incident was indebted for the perfecting his invention.

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