Torture and Truth (Routledge Revivals)

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Routledge, Jun 17, 2016 - History - 162 pages

First published in 1991, this book — through the examination of ancient Greek literary, philosophical and legal texts — analyses how the Athenian torture of slaves emerged from and reinforced the concept of truth as something hidden in the human body. It discusses the tradition of understanding truth as something that is generally concealed and the ideas of ‘secret space’ in both the female body and the Greek temple. This philosophy and practice is related to Greek views of the ‘Other’ (women and outsiders) and considers the role of torture in distinguishing slave and free in ancient Athens. A wide range of perspectives — from Plato to Sartre — are employed to examine the subject.

 

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Contents

1 Rome 1985
1
2 Touchstone
9
3 The Law
35
4 Slavery and Freedom
39
5 Torture
47
6 The Slaves Truth
63
7 Torture and Writing
69
8 Buried Truth
75
9 Some PreSocratics
93
10 Platos Truth
107
11 Democracy
123
12 Plato and Heidegger
127
13 CriticismSelfCriticism
141
14 Women the Body and Torture
145
Index
159
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