Town, City, and Nation: England, 1850-1914

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Oxford University Press, 1983 - History - 339 pages
By the outbreak of the First World War, England had become the world's first mass urban society. In just over sixty years the proportion of town-dwellers had risen from 50 to 80 percent, and during this period many of the most crucial developments in English urban society had taken place. This book provides a uniquely comprehensive analysis of those developments - conurbations, suburbs, satellite towns, garden cities, and seaside resorts. Waller assesses the importance of London, the provincial cities, and manufacturing centers. He also examines the continuing influence of the small country town and "rural" England on political, economic, and cultural growth. Scholarly and readable, this book is a general social history of late nineteenth and early twentieth-century England, seen from an urban perspective.

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Contents

Outline of the urban mass
1
Tables
3
London
24
Population in London 18611921
25
Great cities and manufacturing towns of the conurbations
68
Manchester conurbation administrative units 1888 and 1906
75
New growths
127
town country and towncountry
177
Country and town and country towns
185
Central and local government
240
County boroughs 18881914
248
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About the author (1983)

P. J. Waller is at Merton College, Oxford.

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