Transforming Care: A Christian Vision of Nursing Practice

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Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, Jul 6, 2005 - Medical - 211 pages
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Nursing involves skill, judgment, compassion, and respect for human life whether or not the nurse is a Christian. Is there anything distinctive, then, about Christian nurses?

The authors of Transforming Care address the question of how Christian faith molds nursing practice. Suggesting that such faith entails something more essential than evangelism or a certain position on moral dilemmas, they deal with the ordinary, everyday nature of nursing practice.

The first part of the book articulates the relationship between Christian faith and nursing practice while analyzing the concepts of nursing, person, environment, and health common to nursing literature. The second part describes and evaluates nursing practice in three different health care contexts: acute care settings, mental health facilities, and community care contexts. Sidebars throughout the book offer thought-provoking quotations from well-known authors and nursing experts.

Contributors:

Cheryl Brandsen
Bart Cusveller
Mary Molewyk Doornbos
Mary Flikkema
Ruth E. Groenhout
Arlene Hoogewerf
Kendra G. Hotz
Clarence Joldersma
Barbara Timmermans
 

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An insightful text that covers the board spectrum of nursing with great examples as well as integrating the Christian faith to the practice of nursing.

Contents

A Theological Interpretation of Nursing Practice
17
A Christian Vision of Nursing and Persons
40
A Christian Vision of Health and Environment
67
How Christian Faith Shapes Nursing Values Care and Justice
93
Christian Faith and Nursing Practice
115
PsychiatricMental Health Nursing
117
Community Health Nursing
143
Acute Care Nursing
167
Works Cited
198
Index
207
Copyright

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Page 28 - And the king will answer them, 'Truly I tell you, just as you did it to one of the least of these who are members of my family, you did it to me.
Page 6 - Whatever else revelation means it does mean an event in our history which brings rationality and wholeness into the confused joys and sorrows of personal existence and allows us to discern order in the brawl of communal histories.
Page 36 - The young and the old are lying on the ground in the streets; my young women and my young men have fallen by the sword; in the day of your anger you have killed them, slaughtering without mercy.
Page 35 - O wall of the daughter of Zion, let tears run down like a river day and night; Give thyself no respite; let not the apple of thine eye cease. 19 Arise, cry out in the night, at the beginning of the watches...
Page 35 - Look, O LORD, and consider! To whom have you done this? Should women eat their offspring, the children they have borne? Should priest and prophet be killed in the sanctuary of the Lord?
Page 35 - Arise, cry out in the night, at the beginning of the watches! Pour out your heart like water before the presence of the Lord! Lift your hands to him for the lives of your children who faint for hunger at the head of every street.

About the author (2005)

Mary Molewyk Doornbos is professor of nursing and chair of the Department of Nursing at Calvin College, Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Ruth E. Groenhout is professor of philosophy at Calvin College, Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Kendra G. Hotzis Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee. She is an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).

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