Transnational Conflicts: Central America, Social Change and Globalization

Front Cover
In this timely and provocative study, William I. Robinson challenges received wisdom on Central America. He starts with an exposition on the new global capitalism. Then, drawing on a wide range of historical documentation, interviews, and social science research, he proceeds to show how capitalist globalization has thoroughly transformed the region, disrupting the conventional pattern of revolutionary upheaval, civil wars, and pacification, and ushering in instead a new transnational model of economy and society.

Beyond his focus on Central America, Robinson provides a critical framework for understanding development and social change in other regions of the world in the age of globalization. Demonstrating how the very forces of capitalism have brought into being new social agents and political actors unlikely to acquiesce in the face of the emerging order, Transnational Conflicts shows why the Isthmus, along with other regions, is likely to return to the headlines in the near future.
 

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Contents

Development and Social Change
1
Origin of this Study and Methodological and Epistemological Concerns
3
Organization of the Book
6
The Dialectics of Globalization and Development
9
The Problematic of Globalization and Development Globalization as Epochal Shift and Systemic Change
10
From a World Economy to a Global Economy
13
Towards a New Transnational Studies
20
Towards a New Conceptualization of Development
28
Tourism and Hospitality
189
The Export of Labor and Remittances
203
Conclusions
209
The New Transnational Model in Central America II Incorporation into Global Society
214
From the Developmental State to the NeoLiberal State and the New Hegemony of Capital
217
Transnationalization of Civil Society in Central America
222
The NGO Phenomenon in Central America
226
Commodification Financial Liberalization and Proletarianization
235

Contours of Global Capitalist Society
35
Transnationalization of the State
42
Transnational Hegemony and a Global Social Structure of Accumulation
48
Conceptualizing GlobalRegionalLocal Change
55
Transnational Processes and Transitions to Global Capitalism
56
A Model of Transnational Processes
61
The Politics of Globalization and the Transitions in Central America
63
Central America as a Site of Transnational Processes
64
An Overview of the Transitions
66
Country Case Studies
71
Transition Under Direct US Tutelage
87
The Paradoxes of the Counterinsurgency State
102
A Divergent Route to Globalization
118
From Exceptionalism to Globalization
132
The New Transnational Model in Central America I Incorporation into the Global Economy
147
Central America in the World Economy Prior to Globalization
149
Central Americas Emerging Profile in the Global Economy
156
From ISI to the Maquiladoras
159
NonTraditional Agricultural Exports
174
Financial Liberalization and the New Financial Elite
236
The Privatization of Social Reproduction
244
Rural Transformation Depeasantization and Urbanization
252
Transnational Social Structure
259
Transnational Migration
270
Global and Central American Dimensions
283
The Contradictions of Global Capitalism and the Future of Central America
295
Can Capitalist Expansion be Sustained?
297
The Viability of the Transnational Model
300
Global Capitalism and Social Exclusion in Central America
303
Maldevelopment for Whom in Central America?
308
The Future of Popular Struggle in Central America and in Global Society
312
The Illusion of Peace and Democracy in Central America
315
A Long March Through Civil Society? The Prospects for CounterHegemony
319
Final Considerations
325
An Afterword on Researching Globalization and Social Change
330
Notes
333
Index
387
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About the author (2003)

William Robinson is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is the author of several books, including David and Goliath: The US War Against Nicaragua and A Theory of Global Capitalism.

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