Understanding Arthur Miller

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Univ of South Carolina Press, 1996 - Literary Criticism - 208 pages
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Alice Griffin's comprehensive appraisal of Arthur Miller's theatrical canon illumines the international importance of a playwright whose work is a mirror of American life. Griffin demonstrates that Miller's plays, though seemingly centered on uniquely American issues, speak to audiences from Brazil to Russia, Iceland to China - the last being a country where Death of a Salesman has enjoyed tremendous popularity despite the unfamiliarity of the Chinese people with Willy Loman's occupation. Griffin discusses Miller's major plays in depth, analyzing characters, plots, themes, dramatic effects, and language. She also reviews his one-act plays of the 1980s, which are growing in popularity; the longer plays from the 1980s for which little commentary exists; two significant plays of the 1990s, The Last Yankee and Broken Glass; and Miller's screenplay for the film version of The Crucible.
 

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Contents

Understanding Arthur Miller
1
All My Sons
19
Death of a Salesman
35
The Crucible
59
A View from the Bridge
81
A Memory of Two Mondays and The American Clock
95
After the Fall and Incident at Vichy
113
Chapters The Price
138
Some Kind of Love Story Elegy for a Lady I Cant Remember Anything Clara and The Archbishops Ceiling
158
The Ride Down Mount Morgan The Last Yankee and Broken Glass
173
Bibliography
191
Index
199
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About the author (1996)

Alice Griffin is a professor emerita and former director of graduate studies in English at Lehman College of the City University of New York. She is the author of Understanding Lillian Hellman, Understanding Arthur Miller, Rebels and Lovers: Shakespeare's Young Heroes and Heroines, and Shakespeare's Women in Love.

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