Unravelling the Franklin Mystery: Inuit Testimony

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McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, 1992 - Social Science - 390 pages
David Woodman's reconstruction of the mysterious events surrounding the disappearance of two British exploration vessels in 1845, under the command of Sir John Franklin, challenges standard interpretations and promises to replace them. Among the many who have tried to discover the truth behind the Franklin disaster, Woodman recognizes the profound importance of the Inuit testimony and analyzes it in depth. He concludes from his investigations that the Inuit probably did visit Franklin's ships while the crew was still on board and that there were some Inuit who actually saw the sinking of one of the ships. He maintains that fewer than ten bodies were found at Starvation Cove and that the last survivors left the cove in 1851, three years after the standard account assumes them to be dead. Woodman also disputes the conclusion of Owen Beattie and John Geiger's book Frozen in Time that lead-poisoning was a major contributing cause of the disaster.
 

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Contents

VII
11
VIII
23
IX
37
X
56
XI
69
XII
83
XIII
98
XIV
110
XXIII
227
XXIV
248
XXV
262
XXVI
270
XXVII
291
XXVIII
305
XXIX
319
XXX
325

XV
121
XVI
123
XVII
139
XVIII
152
XIX
163
XX
180
XXI
194
XXII
209
XXXI
327
XXXII
331
XXXIII
336
XXXIV
339
XXXV
341
XXXVI
367
XXXVII
383
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Page 380 - Voyage in Baffin's Bay and Barrow's Straits, in the Years 1850 and 1851, performed by HM Ships Lady Franklin and Sophia, under the command of Mr. William Penny, in search of the missing Crews of HM Ships Ereb-us and Terror, With Charts and Illustrations.

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