What I Talk About When I Talk About Running

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Random House, Oct 10, 2011 - Biography & Autobiography - 192 pages
57 Reviews

In 1982, having sold his jazz bar to devote himself to writing, Murakami began running to keep fit. A year later, he'd completed a solo course from Athens to Marathon, and now, after dozens of such races, he reflects upon the influence the sport has had on his life and on his writing.

Equal parts travelogue, training log, and reminiscence, this revealing memoir covers his four-month preparation for the 2005 New York City Marathon and settings ranging from Tokyo's Jingu Gaien gardens, where he once shared the course with an Olympian, to the Charles River in Boston.

By turns funny and sobering, playful and philosophical, this is a must-read for fans of this masterful yet private writer as well as for the exploding population of athletes who find similar satisfaction in distance running.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ChristineEllei - LibraryThing

I am not a runner and I often wonder why people choose to put their bodies through grueling marathons. This book explains that very question in a charming and simple way. It was a joy to read, and ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - cattylj - LibraryThing

There were certain passages of this book where Murakami perfectly articulated the motivation behind distance running and other moments that I thought provided some interesting insight on his novels ... Read full review

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About the author (2011)

Haruki Murakami was born in Kyoto in 1949 and now lives near Tokyo. He is the author of many novels as well as short stories and non-fiction. His works include Norwegian Wood, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, Kafka on the Shore, After Dark and What I Talk About When I Talk About Running. His work has been translated into more than forty languages, and the most recent of his many international honours is the Jerusalem Prize, whose previous recipients include J.M. Coetzee, Milan Kundera, and V.S. Naipaul. He has recently written on the Boston Marathon in the wake of the Boston Marathon bombings: http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/books/2013/05/murakami-running-boston-marathon-bombing.html

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