Women and New Labour: Engendering Politics and Policy?

Front Cover
Claire Annesley, Francesca Gains, Kirstein Rummery
Policy Press, 2007 - Political Science - 261 pages
Although there is a growing body of international literature on the feminisation of politics and the policy process and, as New Labour's term of office progresses, a rapidly growing series of texts around New Labour's politics and policies, until now no one text has conducted an analysis of New Labour's politics and policies from a gendered perspective, despite the fact that New Labour have set themselves up to specifically address women's issues and attract women voters. This book fills that gap in an interesting and timely way. Women and New Labour will be a valuable addition to both feminist and mainstream scholarship in the social sciences, particularly in political science, social policy and economics. Instead of focusing on traditionally feminist areas of politics and policy (such as violent crime against women) the authors opt to focus on three case study areas of mainstream policy (economic policy, foreign policy and welfare policy) from a gendered perspective. The analytical framework provided by the editors yields generalisable insights that will outlast New Labour's third term.
 

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Contents

women gender feminising
27
three Women and Nordic labour parties
43
from old to new Labour
63
Tables
64
five Engendering the machinery of governance
93
the gender dimensions
117
Figures
127
seven New Labour policy and the gender pay gap
133
family policy and gender
155
dilemmas and
175
ten New Labour and lesbian and gayfriendly policy
193
eleven The gender dimensions of New Labours international
211
towards an engendered politics and policy?
231
Index
251
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About the author (2007)

Claire Annesley, Politics, School of Social Science, University of Manchester, Francesca Gains, Politics, School of Social Sciences, University of Manchester and Kirstein Rummery, Sociology, Social Policy and Criminology, University of Stirling.

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