Women and Economics: A Study of the Economic Relation Between Men and Women as a Factor in Social Evolution

Front Cover
Courier Corporation, 1898 - Social Science - 167 pages
0 Reviews

Author of the well-known short story "The Yellow Wallpaper" and other important fiction, Charlotte Perkins [Stetson] Gilman (1860–1935) was an ardent advocate of women's rights. In this classic feminist treatise, Gilman argues that women's dependence on men for their livelihood results in a state of arrested intellectual and emotional development deleterious to both genders. Moreover, she explains, such reliance causes shortcomings in the human species as a whole.
A landmark in feminist theory, Women and Economics was translated into seven languages and hailed as the "Bible" of the women's movement. Although its author's influence declined in the post-World War I period, modern feminists have returned to her still-incisive observations on the role and status of women, establishing Gilman as an important early figure in the struggle for women's economic and social rights. Now Gilman's masterpiece of feminist theory is again available in this modestly priced edition, ready to stimulate and inspire a new generation of women and men engaged in the ongoing fight for gender equality. New Introduction by Sheryl L. Meyering.


What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages


Chapter I
Chapter II
Chapter III
Chapter IV
Chapter V
Chapter VI
Chapter VII
Chapter VIII
Chapter IX
Chapter X
Chapter XI
Chapter XII
Chapter XIII
Chapter XIV
Chapter XV

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1898)

Charlotte Perkins Gilman was born in 1860 in Hartford, Conn. Her traumatic childhood led to depression and to her eventual suicide. Gilman's father abandoned the family when she was a child and her mother, who was not an affectionate woman, recruited relatives to help raise her children. Among these relatives was Harriet Beecher Stowe, the author of Uncle Tom's Cabin. Due to her family situation, Gilman learned independence, but also became alienated from her many female relatives. Gilman married in 1884 and was soon diagnosed with depression. She was prescribed bed rest, which only seemed to aggravate her condition and she eventually divorced her husband, fearing that marriage was partly responsible for her depressed state. After this, Gilman became involved in feminist activities and the writing that made her a major figure in the women's movement. Books such as Women and Economics, written in 1898, are proof of her importance as a feminist. Here she states that only when women learn to be economically independent can true equality be achieved. Her fiction works, particularly The Yellow Wallpaper, are also written with feminist ideals. A frequent lecturer, she also founded the feminist magazine Forerunner in 1909. Gilman, suffering from cancer, chose to end her own life and committed suicide on August 17, 1935. More information about this fascinating figure can be found in her book The Living of Charlotte Perkins Gilman: An Autobiography, published in 1935.

Bibliographic information