Work-place: The Social Regulation of Labor Markets

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Guilford Press, Apr 6, 1996 - Business & Economics - 320 pages
This text seeks to construct a conception of the labour market, which is sensitive to the variability in labour market experiences and processes, taking account of the tensions between the global economy and the local organization of labour markets. It considers a complex set of influential factors as educational, political and social factors, which contribute to the complexion of local labour markets.
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION PLACES OF WORK
1
Another Place to Start
6
Landscapes of Labor
12
Toward a Spatialized Political Economy
16
MAKING LABOR MARKETS
21
MAKING WORKERS CONTROL REPRODUCTION REGULATION
23
Labor as a Fictive Commodity
24
Incorporating Labor
26
New Industrial Spaces?
130
Contradictions of Labor Market Flexibility
132
Problems of Skill Formation
136
Regulating Local Flexibilities
137
Skill Formation
138
Social Regulation As Local Regulation
143
Local Institutionalization and the Labor Market
144
DOMESTICATING WORK RESTRUCTURING AT WORK RESTRUCTURING AT HOME
149

Allocating Labor
29
Controlling Labor
32
Reproducing Labor
36
Dilemmas of Labor Regulation
40
STRUCTURING THE LABOR MARKET A SEGMENTATION APPROACH
45
Approaches to Dualism
48
SecondGeneration Approaches
51
ThirdGeneration Approaches
54
The Segmentation of Labor Demand
59
The Segmentation of Labor Supply
63
Segmentation and the State
70
Explanation in Segmentation Theories
72
Segmentation and Causality
74
Regulation Institutionalization and Contingency
75
LOCATING THE LOCAL LABOR MARKET SEGMENTATION REGULATION SPACE
81
Beyond Labor Market Cartography
85
to the Center
86
The Local Labor Market as a Conjunctural Structure
88
A Method of Articulation
89
The Local Construction of Labor Markets
92
Institutions and Local Labor Market Regulation
94
Regulation and Space
95
Putting Labor Institutions in Their Place
98
Geographies of Labor Market Governance
104
Reinstating the Local Labor Market
107
PLACING LABOR MARKETS
115
FLEXIBILIZING LABOR INSECURE WORK IN UNSTABLE PLACES
117
Labor Flexibility and Agglomeration
119
New Flexibility?
123
New Segmentation?
127
Spatial Divisions of Labor
151
The Case of Industrial Homework
157
The Reemergence of Homework in Australia
159
The Labor Process and the Labor Market
162
Exploring the Hidden Geographies of Work
170
Structures and Strategies of Restructuring in Urban Labor Markets
171
Contingent Work Contingent Strategies
173
Local Imperatives of Labor Control
175
BUILDING WORKFARE STATES INSTITUTIONS OF LABOR REGULATION
181
Tendencies and Contradictions
186
From Keynesian Welfare
188
to Schumpeterian Workfare
190
The Case of Thatcherism
197
Schumpeterian Workfare at the Local Scale?
202
Radical Thatcherism and the TECs
204
Market Subordination
207
CostSaving and Flexibility
211
Hollowing Out
217
The Workfare State in Crisis
222
LOCALIZING LABOR GEOPOLITICS OF LABOR REGULATION
228
Global Capital versus Local Labor
229
Geographies of Hegemonic Despotism
236
Deadlock in Detroit
238
Toward Workhouse Regions
244
Replacing Labor Regulation
251
LOCAL DIALECTICS OF LABOR
257
REFERENCES
265
INDEX
302
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

Jamie Peck is reader in economic geography and member of the International Centre for Labour Studies at the University of Manchester. He has published extensively on labor market theory, regional economic restructuring, employment policy evaluation, and the geopolitics of economic governance and social regulation. A research associate of the Centre for Local Economic Strategies, his research has been supported by the UK Economic and Social Research Council, the European Science Foundation, the Commonwealth Fund (New York), and the Australian government, while he has consulted to the European Commission, the UK Department of Employment, and numerous local authorities, labor unions, and economic development agencies. He is currently researching the political economy of "welfare reform" on a Harkness Fellowship at the Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore.

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