Yoruba Proverbs

Front Cover
U of Nebraska Press, 2005 - Social Science - 502 pages
4 Reviews
"Yoruba Proverbs is the most comprehensive collection to date of more than five thousand Yoruban proverbs that showcase Yoruba oral tradition. Following Oyekan Owomoyela's introduction, which provides a framework and description of Yoruba cultural beliefs, the proverbs are arranged by theme into five sections: the good person; the fortunate person (or the good life); relationships; human nature; rights and responsibilities; and truisms. Each proverb is presented in Yoruba with a literal English translation, followed by a brief commentary explaining the meaning of the proverb within the oral tradition." "This definitive source book on Yoruba proverbs is the first to give such detailed, systematic classification and analysis alongside a careful assessment of the risks and pitfalls of submitting this genre to the canons of literary analysis."--BOOK JACKET.
 

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A little chore is of no consequence to an immense task because ''A hairpin does not add much to the luggage of a bride''

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agba tio binu

Contents

On humility selfcontrol selfknowledge selfrespect and selfrestraint
41
On perspicaciousness good judgment perceptiveness reasonableness sagacity savoir faire wisdom and worldly wisdom
89
On caginess caution moderation patience and prudence
146
On perseverance industry resilience selfconfidence selfreliance resourcefulness daring fortitude and invulnerability
198
On consistency honesty openness plain speaking and reliability
237
On consideration kindness and thoughtfulness
255
On good name good repute
267
On health
273
On relationships with friends and acquaintances
324
On relationships with strangers
339
On relationships with the less fortunate
341
On fate and reciprocity
345
On human vulnerability and limitations
357
On mortality
388
On inscrutability
393
On inequality
400

On happiness
275
On children and elders
281
On material wealth
284
On longevity
289
On wealth in people popularity
290
On relationships with the divine and the supernatural
297
On relationships with the family
300
On relationships within the community
312
On relationships with elders
321
On the right to life
423
On freedom to be oneself
424
On the right to human dignity
428
On the right to ones patrimony and to property
432
On subservience to authority
437
On just deserts
439
Miscellany
453
References
501
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Popular passages

Page 2 - I seeż said the blind man, as he picked up his hammer and saw.
Page 1 - short sentences into which, as in rules, the ancients have compressed life
Page 13 - as a means of amusement, in educating the young, to sanction institutionalized behavior, as a method of gaining favor in court, in performing religious rituals and association ceremonies, and to give point and add color to ordinary conversation
Page 2 - exist for no other reason than to decorate speech. These are devices of hyperbole; they take an ongoing argument and lend it wit and color
Page 15 - an art form. It ignores the importance that some societies attach to linguistic and literary features associated with the proverb, especially the sharp wit, the sarcasm, the humor, the rhetoric, and, indeed, all the aesthetic and
Page 22 - not to be too lavish in their gifts, to consume their food themselves before visitors arrive and they are deprived of the greater share of it, and not to grant undue hospitality without the prospect
Page 7 - all of the devices we commonly associate with poetry in English: meter, binary construction and balanced phrasing, rhyme, assonance and alliteration, conciseness, metaphor, and occasional inverted word order and unusual construction
Page 1 - A proverb is a remnant of the ancient philosophy preserved amid many
Page 27 - The custodian then moves from ward to ward narrating the proverb and the circumstances of its original use to the public
Page 15 - with a poetic dimension, or demonstrate to his opponent his superior sophistication, education, eloquence, or sensitivity in the use

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