Zimbabwe's New Diaspora: Displacement and the Cultural Politics of Survival

Front Cover
JoAnn McGregor, Ranka Primorac
Berghahn Books, Jun 1, 2010 - Social Science - 268 pages

Zimbabwe’s crisis since 2000 has produced a dramatic global scattering of people. This volume investigates this enforced dispersal, and the processes shaping the emergence of a new "diaspora" of Zimbabweans abroad, focusing on the most important concentrations in South Africa and in Britain. Not only is this the first book on the diasporic connections created through Zimbabwe’s multifaceted crisis, but it also offers an innovative combination of research on the political, economic, cultural and legal dimensions of movement across borders and survival thereafter with a discussion of shifting identities and cultural change. It highlights the ways in which new movements are connected to older flows, and how displacements across physical borders are intimately linked to the reworking of conceptual borders in both sending and receiving states. The book is essential reading for researchers/students in migration, diaspora and postcolonial literary studies.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
I Zimbabwean Diasporic Communities in South Africa
35
1 Makwerekwere
37
2 Zimbabwean Farmworkers in Limpopo Province South Africa
59
3 The Politics of Legal Status for Zimbabweans in South Africa
77
II The Cultural Politics of Survival in Britain
101
4 Zimbabwean Transnational Diaspora Politics in Britain
103
5 Diaspora and Dignity
122
III Diasporic Identities and Transnational Media
181
8 Debating Zimbabweanness in Diasporic Internet Forums
183
9 Rhodesians Never Die?
202
10 Exile and the Internet
229
11 One Dandelion Seedhead
246
12 Making New Connections
255
Notes on Contributors
261
Index
265

6 Burial at Home?
144
7 Negotiating Transnational Families
164

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About the author (2010)

JoAnn McGregor is Lecturer at University College London. She has published on Zimbabwean politics, society and history, and on forced migration. She is co-author of Violence and Memory: One Hundred Years in the Dark Forests of Matabeleland, Zimbabwe (2000) and co-edits the Journal of Southern African Studies.

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