Hunters in the Snow

Front Cover
The Cornovia Press, Sep 15, 2014 - Fiction - 164 pages
0 Reviews

Vienna in the early 20th century was, in the words of our protagonist and narrator, a soulless, syphilitic whore of a city; a turbulent and bubbling melting pot of races, creeds and politics, rapidly expanding as it strained to contain the ever-increasing multitudes. In such places the nightmare moments of modern history are conceived. This novel is a fictionalised account of those who were to change the very collective psyche of mankind. It is a vivid and poignant portrayal of the sometimes thin dividing line between becoming good or evil.

D.M. Thomas is a British novelist and poet, born and living in Cornwall. His novel The White Hotel was an international bestseller and shortlisted for the Booker Prize. It is rightly considered a modern classic, translated into more than 30 languages. John Updike said of the book: ‘Astonishing … A forthright sensuality mixed with a fine historical feeling for the nightmare moments in modern history, a dreamlike fluidity and quickness’; the statement could equally be applied to Hunters in the Snow.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
6
Section 3
12
Section 4
16
Section 5
23
Section 6
33
Section 7
42
Section 8
48
Section 15
78
Section 16
83
Section 17
89
Section 18
95
Section 19
102
Section 20
107
Section 21
113
Section 22
117

Section 9
53
Section 10
58
Section 11
61
Section 12
66
Section 13
70
Section 14
72
Section 23
124
Section 24
127
Section 25
132
Section 26
136
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2014)

D.M. Thomas was born in Redruth, Cornwall. He attended Trewirgie Primary School and Redruth Grammar School before graduating with First Class Honours in English from New College, Oxford in 1959, after which he became a teacher and was head of the English Department at Hereford College of Education, before becoming a full-time writer. In the 1950s, at height of the Cold War, Thomas studied Russian during his National Service. He retained a lifelong interest in Russian culture and literature. This culminated in a series of well-received translations of Russian poetry in the 1980s. He lived and worked in Australia and the United States before returning to his native Cornwall.

Bibliographic information