The Road To Mecca

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The Book Foundation, 1954 - Biography & Autobiography - 416 pages
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Part travelogue, part autobiography, "The Road to Mecca" is the compelling story of a Western journalist and adventurer who converted to Islam in the early twentieth century. A spiritual and literary counterpart of Wilfred Thesiger and a contemporary of T. E. Lawrence (Lawrence of Arabia), Muhammad Asad journeyed around the Middle East, Afghanistan and India. This is an account of Asad's adventures in Arabia, his inner awakening, and his relationships with nomads and royalty alike, set in the wake of the First World War. It can be read on many levels: as a eulogy to a lost world, and as the poignant account of a man's search for meaning. It is also a love story, defying convention and steeped in loss. With its evocative descriptions and profound insights on the Islamic world, "The Road to Mecca" is a work of immense value today. 

 

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User Review  - miss.whiskers - LibraryThing

Interesting story about a Jewish convert to Islam. Some obnoxious fawning which I found cringeworthy. Asad's translation of the Qur'an is quite popular. Read full review

Contents

THE STORY OF A STORY
THIRST 18
BEGINNING OF THE ROAD 52
WINDS 81
VOICES 117
SPIRIT AND FLESH 153
DREAMS 182
MIDWAY 205
JINNS 243
PERSIAN LETTER 277
DAJJAL 312
END OF THE ROAD 379
GLOSSARY 412
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About the author (1954)

Muhammad Asad (born Leopold Weiss; 2 July 1900 – 23 February 1992) was a Jewish-born Austro-Hungarian journalist, traveler, writer, linguist, thinker, political theorist, diplomat and Islamic scholar. Asad was one of the most influential European Muslims of the 20th century.

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