A Narrative of the treatment experienced by a Gentleman, during a state of mental derangement; designed to explain the causes and the nature of Insanity, etc

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Effingham Wilson, 1840 - Mental illness - 430 pages
 

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Page 323 - And dreams in their development have breath, And tears, and tortures, and the touch of joy ; They leave a weight upon our waking thoughts, They take a weight from off our waking toils, They do divide our being...
Page 254 - O God, we have heard with our ears, and our fathers have declared unto us, the noble works that Thou didst in their days, and in the old time before them.
Page xxvii - Nutrita faustis sub penetralibus Posset, quid Augusti paternus In pueros animus Nerones. Fortes creantur fortibus et bonis ; Est in juvencis, est in equis patrum Virtus...
Page 297 - ... more flaunty than the others — that on the left was, I think, called the spirit of my eldest sister — that on the right was the spirit of Herminet Herbert. I understood the use of these spirits, which were spirits of humor and politeness, to be necessary to a holy turn of thought, and that the world did not like the use, or understand the use of them. My thoughts flowed regularly from left to right, guided by these voices and their suggestions; and if I turned them from right to left, I was...
Page 323 - And tears and tortures, and the touch of joy ; They leave a weight upon our waking thoughts, They take a weight from off our waking toils ; They do divide our being; they become A portion of ourselves as of our time, And look like heralds of eternity; They pass like spirits of the past...
Page 302 - I'D BE A BUTTERFLY" I'D be a Butterfly born in a bower, Where roses and lilies and violets meet; Roving for ever from flower to flower, And kissing all buds that are pretty and sweet! I'd never languish for wealth, or for power, I'd never sigh to see slaves at my feet: I'd be a Butterfly born in a bower, Kissing all buds that are pretty and sweet. O could I pilfer the wand of a fairy, I'd have a pair of those beautiful wings; Their summer days' ramble is sportive and airy, They sleep in a rose when...
Page xiv - LONG years! — It tries the thrilling frame to bear And eagle-spirit of a Child of Song — Long years of outrage, calumny, and wrong ; Imputed madness, prisoned solitude, And the mind's canker in its savage mood, When the impatient thirst of light and air Parches the heart...
Page 274 - Thus you will hear one lunatic declare that he is made of iron, and that nothing can break him;another, that he is a china vessel, and that he runs in danger of being destroyed every minute. The meaning of the spirit, is that this man is strong as iron, the other frail as an earthen vessel; but the lunatic takes the literal sense, and his imagination not being under his own control, he in a manner feels it. In like manner, when I was desired to suffocate myself on my pillow, and that all the world...
Page 273 - I suspect that many of the delusions which I laboured under, and which other insane persons labour under, consist in their mistaking a figurative or a poetic form of speech for a literal one ; and this observation may be of importance to those who attend to their cure.
Page 324 - Sibyls of the future ; they have power, — The tyranny of pleasure and of pain ; They make us what we were not, — what they will, And shake us with the vision that's gone by, The dread of vanish'd shadows.

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