London Magazine: Or, Gentleman's Monthly Intelligencer..., Volume 25

Front Cover
C. Ackers, 1756
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 538 - It would doubtlefs be very aftonifhing to the reader to be told, that even the purity of my own writings has not at all times exempted me from the cenfure of thefe maiden gentlewomen. The Nankin breeches of poor Patrick' the footman, in N 1 30 of thefe papers, have given inconceivable offence.
Page 26 - ... public-houses, and money in their pockets to squander there in gaming, drunkenness and extravagance. The last of these is an evil of so gigantic a size, so conducive to the universal corruption, of the lower part of this nation, and so entirely destructive of all family order, decency, and ceconomy, that it well deserves the consideration of a legislature, who are not themselves under the influence of their servants, and can pay them their wages without any inconvenience. From what has been said...
Page 538 - ... flew from him with precipitation, suffering him to put it into his pocket and go fairly off with it. This...
Page 576 - BAILIFF, who used to hold my courts, has left me ; and my game-keeper, who has been obliged to lie during this hard winter in a tent in the garden, is ordered back again into the north...
Page 249 - Thurlow, and the heirs male of his body, lawfully begotten, the dignity of a Baron of the kingdom of Great Britain...
Page 144 - em ; Thofe days, they never read the French,— They tang'd 'em. If tafte evaporates by too high breeding, And eke is overlaid, by too deep reading ; Left then in fearch of this, you lofe your feeling...
Page 25 - ... and Joan, who ufed to be but as good as my lady in the dark, is now by no means her inferior in the day-light. In great families I have frequently intreated the maitre d...
Page 175 - LETTERS written from the heart and on real occasions, though not always decorated with the flowers of eloquence, must be far more useful and interesting than the studied paragraphs of Pliny, or the pompous declamations of Balsac ; as they contain just pictures of life and manners, and are the genuine emanations of nature.
Page 26 - By their careleffnefs and idlenefs they have obliged us to hire all our horfes, and fo have got rid of the labour of looking after them. By their impofitions on the road they have forced us into poft-chaifes, by which means they are at liberty to travel by themfelves, as it beft fuits their own eafe and convenience.
Page 561 - Co fair renown* - • Could I to one faint ray afpire, One fpark of that celeftial fire, The leading cynofure, that glow'd While Smith explor'd the dark abode, Where Wiftom fate on Nature's fhrine, How.

Bibliographic information