HISTORY OF EUROPE DURING THE FRENCG REVOLUTION

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 323 - Nothing could stop that astonishing infantry. No sudden burst of undisciplined valour, no nervous enthusiasm weakened the stability of their order, their flashing eyes were bent on the dark columns in their front, their measured tread shook the ground, their dreadful volleys swept away the head of every formation, their deafening shouts overpowered the dissonant cries that broke from all parts of the tumultuous crowd, as slowly and with a horrid carnage it was pushed by the incessant vigour of the...
Page 49 - I pretend to enumerate all he said on the subject ; but it may give you pleasure to hear that it was conveyed in language which would only suffer by my attempting to transcribe it, and with a tone and taste which gave me a very high idea of his abilities and accomplishments, which I had hitherto considered as confined to manners, certainly superior to those of any living gentleman, " This interview was accidental.
Page 103 - ... single pauper to be found, offers a boundless field for future increase. It is not a figure of speech, but the simple truth, to assert that, circumstanced as the two countries are, there is not an axe falls in the woods of America which does not put in motion some shuttle, or hammer, or wheel in England.
Page 38 - I am the unfortunate man ; my name is Bellingham : it is a private injury ; I know what I have done ; it was a denial of justice on the part of government.
Page 276 - Notwithstanding what has been printed in gazettes and newspapers, we have never seen small bodies, unsupported, opposed to large ; nor has the experience of any Officer realized the stories, which all have read, of whole armies being driven by a handful of light infantry or dragoons.
Page 323 - ... bent on the dark columns in their front ; their measured tread shook the ground ; their dreadful volleys swept away the head of every formation; their deafening shouts overpowered the dissonant cries that broke from all parts of the tumultuous crowd, as foot by foot, and with a horrid carnage, it was driven by the incessant vigour of the attack to the farthest edge of the hill.
Page 630 - Almighty, the witness and the defender of the truth. It is unnecessary for me to recall to the minds of the generals, the officers, or the soldiers, their duty and their bravery. The blood of the valiant Sclavonians flows in their veins. Warriors ! you defend your religion, your country, and your liberty ! I am with you. God is against the aggressor.
Page 322 - In vain did Soult, by voice and gesture, animate his Frenchmen; in vain did the hardiest veterans, extricating themselves from the crowded columns, sacrifice their lives to gain time for the mass to open out on such a fair field ; in vain did the mass itself bear up, and fiercely striving, fire indiscriminately upon friends and foes while the horsemen hovering on the flank threatened to charge the advancing line.
Page 103 - ... over whom he has no control, but who, if they were ever so hostile to us, could not annoy us — which supports at once all that remains of liberty beyond the seas, and gives life and vigour to its main pillar within the realm, the manufactures and commerce of England ! And now, sir, look to the other side of this picture.
Page 127 - I was induced to attribute their conduct to the excess of the spirit of party. ' I assure you that, highly as I am gratified and flattered by the approbation of , and yourself and others, that which gives me most pleasure in the account which I received last night from England, is to be convinced that such men could not be unjust towards an Officer in the service of the country abroad...

Bibliographic information